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All Suggestions for Health Sciences Library

Suggestion

(Jul 24/17) to all libraries: mills, thode, innis, and HSL.

it is much preferred when students are at the desk. they tend to be able to realate more to students and are more knowledgable about research and mcmaster online tools. it is also more comfortable for students to approach students. they should be on the desk longer throughout the day. thanx a bunch

Library response:

Thank you for your response. It is true that our student workers are excellent. I'm glad you find them so helpful. In the Health Sciences Library, our full time staff have additional educational credentials above and beyond what our students learn through our regular training programs, so in order to have a full range research supports, we will need to continue to have both full-time and part-time staff working in the library. I will share your comments with the service managers and ask them work on establishing a balance of staff with varying areas of expertise when they make the desk schedule. Please feel free to contact me directly if you have more feedback about our staff and services. Thank You.

(Aug 15/17)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jun 1/17) Hello,

Within the last three weeks, I have booked HSL 1B15 (the group study room with the Mondopad)
several times. The Mondopad is an excellent resource that my group and I value. However, the
USB receiver component of the keyboard and mouse is missing, effectively making the keyboard
and mouse unusable. We made it clear to the library staff the first time we noticed and they
made it clear that they understood the issue and said that they would fix it. A couple weeks
later, we asked the desk to sign out the keyboard and mouse while asking them if it was
fixed. They said it was, but unfortunately, it wasnt. If this resource is not repaired, why
is it still available to be signed out?
Please, I ask that this issue be remedied. Perhaps with a replacement, but this time,
perhaps it would be appropriate to make it policy that the USB receiver stay plugged into the
Mondopad all the time (even tape it so nobody removes it).

Library response:

Thank you for your message. I have connected with our library systems staff and they hope to fix the problem today. I will post another response when I hear from them that issue is resolved. In the meantime, I'd like to learn more about your experience communicating with the Library staff. Please contact me directly if you are willing to discuss this in more detail. Thank you. 

(Jun 5/17)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

I am happy to report the problem is resolved. (2017-06-08)


Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(May 6/17) students at main desk in health sci are very polite and always welcoming. mills desk students
are never a acknowledging me or being friendly. poor experience at mills.

Library response:

Thank you for the feedback. I have shared your comments with our student workers and their supervisor so that they all know how much their hard work is appreciated. 

(May 12/17)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 20/17) Emphasize the the Reading Pavilion is a group study space (as listed on the map on the website)
rather than silent study. Most people are not aware of this and get upset at people using the
space for group work as they are talking.

Library response:

Thank you for your feedback. You are correct, the Pavilion space is not reserved for silent study. We do our best make sure all students understand that we have quiet, silent, and conversation zones. When students complain, we direct them to the appropriate signage in the library and to our website. However, it sounds like the message isn’t reaching everyone. Therefore, I will be sharing your comments with our Marketing team and ask that they come up with new strategies for sharing this information. Please contact me directly if you wish to discuss your concerns in more detail.

(Apr 20/17)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library),Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 12/16) fire alarm:
today at 1:09 - 31 rings, then a screech, 6 rings, 4 more screeches, 11 rings
no message (and it is now 1:19)
This is a hospital. Are there no audiologists on staff? Is there no concern about damage to
hearing from high decibels? from prolonged and repeated noise? Why 31 rings? Why do 10 not
suffice? Why the screeches?
And - how about a location ???

Library response:

Thank you for sharing your concern. We are not sure why today's fire alarm do not follow proper protocol (including the regular announcement about location). I have sent a note to hospital security to obtain more information. 

(Dec 12/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 8/16) up the temperature, PLEASE.
how long does it take until seasonal changes come into effect ? perhaps in March?

Library response:

We have contacted building maintenance and they are working on a solution. We expect to see a difference in the library temperature very soon. It would be helpful if you contacted me directly so that I can learn more about where in the library you are working so that we can concentrate our efforts on that particular area. Thank your for sharing your concerns. 

(Dec 8/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Temperature, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 2/16) re. the womens washroom, upper level at the entrance to the library:
why is there no hot (or at least, warm) water in the taps?
Last week: same problem.

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this to our attention. I have forwarded your concerns to facilities management. When I receive a response I will update this post. 

(Dec 2/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 28/16) Could the heating be turned on (up??) in the library please?
Its unreasonable to expect one to wear coats and hats!
The Media room is comfortable - the other areas arent.
thanks.

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to raise your concern.  Regulating the temperature in the library is always a challenge during seasonal changes.  The temperature is controlled centrally and can vary between areas in the library, times of day, and day of the week.  We have contacted Engineering Services to follow-up.   

(Nov 28/16)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Temperature, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 17/16) Can students please be reminded that the library is for studying and that talk should be kept
to a minimum !! There are certain groups of students who are under the impression that the
library is a meeting / social space and do everything but study there. These students are
distracting to all of those around them and make it very hard for serious students to
actually study. If students are participating in group projects study rooms are available, if
HSL is busy other libraries also have these study rooms :)

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this to our attention. As you have pointed out, there are spaces in the library that are designated for group study (like the study rooms) and other areas that are designated for quiet and silent study. The following webpage provides an overview of these areas: http://hsl.mcmaster.ca/services/study/index.html. I will remind library staff to monitor the silent study areas, but if we miss something, please feel free to approach someone at the main desk and ask for assistance. There are however, spaces on the upper level, in the History of Medicine Room and in the Reserve Reading Room, where in conversation is permitted. If you would like more information about our silent, quiet, and group study zones, please contact me directly. 

(Nov 18/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 5/16) Would it be possible for the study cubicles on the lower level to be wiped down at some point during the day as they do at the Innis library? For example in the early morning, or right before closing the night before. Too many people keep eating and leaving residues of their food on the study surfaces.

Thank You

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to share your concerns. I have forwarded your concerns directly to the managers responsible for addressing housekeeping in the Faculty of Health Sciences. We are currently working very hard to ensure the Library is a welcoming and clean space for our students.

 Please feel free to contact me if you have any additional questions or comments.

(Apr 5/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 31/16) I am consistently surprised by how dirty HSL is, regardless of the time of day. I find garbage on the floor, hair in the cubicles, spilt drinks, used toilet paper on the bathroom floor. Its just disgusting. Students are of course part of the problem. Maybe posters in the cubicles reminding people to pick up after themselves would be helpful. But I am very doubtful that HSL is being cleaned regularly, especially the cubicles and washrooms.

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to share your concerns. The Library has been working closely with housekeeping and facilities management in an attempt to address these issues. Last Thursday (March 31st) all of the public washrooms were steam cleaned. We are now reviewing housekeeping’s cleaning schedule to see if they can prioritize other areas of concern (i.e. garbage removal & wiping down the study carrels and tables). The Health Sciences Library has over 50,000 visitors each month, making us one of the busiest spaces on campus. Keeping up with cleaning demands has been challenging, but we are committed to addressing the issue.

 Please feel free to contact me if you have any additional questions or comments.

(Apr 5/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 16/16) I love the new arrangement of bookshelves in the Reserve Room (2nd floor behind main desk)! I think moving some of the couches/armchairs from the Reading Pav to the new space, or some desks/tables would be an excellent use of the space. Thanks!

Library response:

Thank you for the positive feedback and the great idea. We have ordered new furniture for the empty space and it should arrive tomorrow (March 22nd). We have ordered tables and chairs for individual study. Once everything is set up we will see how much room is left for armchairs. If we can add more seating we will. We are always looking for ways to add more places to sit in the library so any suggestions you have are appreciated.

(Mar 21/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 24/16) I really love the new online room booking and was wondering if it will be permanent? It makes room booking and staying organized so much easier. Please keep it!

Library response:

 

Thank you for your positive comments about the new online room booking system. We have every intention of making this service permanent. We’ve launched the service as a pilot to give us flexibility to make changes as we work out the bugs. From time to time we may need to take the system down while we tweak the software. Please share this message with your classmates and encourage them to contact us if they encounter any problems. The more feedback we get from students the faster we can move through our testing phase and arrive at a permanent system.

 

 

 

(Feb 25/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 13/16) I would like to thank the maintenance staff, administration and contractors responsible for getting the water pressure for the bottle refill station on the lower floor study area back up to normal. This is tremendously convenient and deeply appreciated.

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to write us. I will pass your comments on the relevant parties (HHS Engineering and FHS Facilities) to let them know you appreciate their work.

(Feb 16/16)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 12/16) Hello,
I would like to suggest that the reference manager, Mendeley, be installed on the computers and/or laptops of the HSL library. The software is very useful as it allows for the addition of citations and references quickly to Word, as well as their storage online so that they can be retrieved from any computer with the software. Its a great alternative to RefWorks, which has now be phased out.

Thank You!

Library response:

Hello - thank you for submitting your request. At the moment, web access to Mendeley is supported, and recently they added the ability to add documents (2015-07) via their website interface: https://feedback.mendeley.com/forums/4941-general/suggestions/1022895-upload-pdfs-using-mendeley-website-interface

(Jan 12/16)
Answered by:

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 30/15) More computers with SPSS would be fantastic. Kinda difficult when only 4 of them have SPSS on them. My stats class has 300 students so. And the labs are always in use for classes.

Library response:

Fortunately, there are a few options to help alleviate your frustration.  UTS provides a link to their student labs calendar which can help identify the labs that are not booked for classes during the day.  Alternatively, Thode and Mills Libraries offer SPSS on their “research computers”.   Click here for their equipment locations and available software.  Software costs prevent us from increasing our SPSS access at this time.

(Mar 31/15)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 9/14) Hello,

I am curious if anybody has noticed a subtle vibration running through the lower floor of Health Sciences Library.

I am trying to determine if there is actually a vibration or if I am suffering from a kinaesthetic hallucination possibly brought on by some kind of environmental factor.

Its not quite people in the air conditioning, but neither is it particularly conducive to my studies.

Thank you for your assistance.

Library response:

I have investigated with the staff working that day and they did not receive any complaints about floor vibrations.  In order to do a thorough investigation, I will require additional information.  Please contact me directly to facilitate this.  If you experience the vibrations again, please inform the staff at the Circulation Desk.  This will help us isolate the date and time the incident occurred.

(Oct 14/14)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Sep 14/14) The vending machine downstairs does not work and when Williams is closed there is no way to get any water. Even if you walk to MDCL there are no machines that vend water (that I have seen). It would be nice to grab a bottle of water sometimes if possible. Thank you.

Library response:

Thank you for letting us know abuot the vending machines. I will forward your concern to the correct person.

I share your frustration about the access to drinking water near the Health Sciences Library. There is an issue with the library water fountain and the water is unsafe for drinking.

The water in the library washrooms is safe for drinking. The accessible washrooms on both the upper and lower levels have faucets that can accommodate large water bottles. There are also drinking water taps available in the hospital cafeteria and beside the Tim Hortons on the 1st floor of MDCL.

 

Thank you for taking time to express your concern and feel free to contact me directly if you have any other questions. Thank you.

(Sep 15/14)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(May 20/14) I waited 10 minutes at the farther end of the circulation desk (the end which is near the reserve room) before the staff who was at the desk noticed I was waiting. Is there a way we can get around this issue? Thanks!

Library response:

I'm sorry that you had to wait for service at the desk.  Unfortunately, the setup of the desk doesn't allow staff to easily see when someone is waiting at the reserve station.  Installing a mirror is not feasible as it would still require staff to continually check it.  The best bet is for our library patrons to make their presence known to staff.  Our staff do appreciate it when they are made aware that someone is waiting and are not offended when someone asks for help by saying "excuse me" or "hello" etc.  Please feel free to let staff know you are there.  You shouldn't have to wait for them to notice you.  I will also remind our staff and student assistants to stay mindful and check the reserve station regularly to see if anyone is waiting.

(May 20/14)
Answered by: Lynn Schneider (Supervisor, Circulation & Collection Maintenance, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(May 20/14) Can there be more printsmart paystations please!

Library response:

PrintSmart is a campus-wide networked printing/copying system and is not a library service.  As such, those overseeing PrintSmart have changed the method of payment to add value to your account.  In May, they went to an online only payment system (http://printsmart.mcmaster.ca/). The advantage is you can now pay at any computer with Internet access rather than having to come into the campus libraries.  If you have any questions or concerns about the service, I recommend contacting PrintSmart directly printsmart@mcmaster.ca

(Jun 2/14)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 31/14) If a fire is not an imminent danger, then why are we listening to shouted announcements about it?

If a fire is an imminent danger, then why not word the announcement more clearly?

Isnt there a bit of a logical discontinuity between cryptic and shouted?

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to express your concern. The Health Sciences Library is located inside the Hospital, which is administered by Hamilton Health Sciences. As a result, HHS fire safety regulations apply in our library space. The intercom system and the process for making announcements have been designed to ensure the safety of all building occupants including patients, staff and students.
Although the wording of the announcements may seem cryptic, the information does have meaning for library staff who are required to participate in regular fire safety training. In the event we had to evacuate the library, the messaging would be very clear and library staff would be available to help direct the evacuation process.

I realize that the frequency and volume of the announcements are disruptive, however, there is no way they can be changed or be eliminated. Please feel free to contact me directly if you have additional questions.

 

(Mar 31/14)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 28/14) There is no water fountain in HSL. It is not good for our health

Library response:

I share your frustration about the water fountain in the Health Sciences Library. Unfortunately, there is an issue with the plumbing in this area and the water is unsafe for drinking. This is a larger issue with the plumbing in the wall behind the water fountain. Building management and the Health and Safety office have not been able to find a workable solution. Until that happens, the fountain will remain closed.

The water in the library washrooms is safe for drinking. The accessible washrooms on both the upper and lower levels have faucets that can accommodate large water bottles. There are also drinking water taps available in the hospital cafeteria.

Thank you for taking time to express your concern and feel free to contact me directly if you have any other questions. Thank you.

 

(Mar 31/14)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 19/14) The lighting on the lower level of HSL servicing the cubicles does not seem to be bright enough. Unless you sit close to the window you are forced to stare at an extremely bright computer screen and if you are using a hardcopy there is nothing you can do. One row of lights also tends to turn off periodically. When the lights are due for servicing a would suggest addressing this. Thanks.

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to express your concern. When the library was renovated several years ago, “green lighting” fixtures were installed. Depending on the natural light in the library, the lights should self-adjust. When it is sunny outside, the increased natural light should trigger the lights to automatically turn off, allowing us to save energy. Unfortunately, some of these fixtures are starting to malfunction. I suspect that is what is happening on the lower level of the library. I appreciate you taking the time to report the problem. We will contact building maintenance as soon as possible. Please contact me directly if you would like to discuss this in more detail.

(Feb 19/14)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 19/14) Please add the journal of Medical Internet Research to our access. High relevance and many articles support my research interest.
Many thanks, MSc candidate(eHealth)

Library response:

The use and accessibility of this title has been reviewed and the journal title will be added to the HSL collection.

(Feb 25/14)
Answered by: mclell

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 12/14) Ive noticed that for about 1 year now, the internet connection offered in the Health Sciences library (be it MacSecure or MacConnect) displays extremely unstable behaviour. The connection is constantly dropping, which can be quite irksome at the high rate at which it happens. I thought the issue could be a system overload, especially now with the boom in smartphone use. I am wondering if the library is aware of the issue and if so, are there any plans in the near future for improving wireless capacity/stability?

Thank you.

Library response:

Thank you for your comment on wireless access in the library.  The campus wireless network is managed centrally by University Technology Services (UTS) http://www.mcmaster.ca/uts/connections/network/macconnect/wireless/wlscoverage.htm.  It is my understanding that they are aware of the issues and have been working to address them.  For example, last year they expanded the wireless canopy on campus http://dailynews.mcmaster.ca/article/surfs-up-mcmaster-expanding-its-wi-fi-network/.   We will pass on your feedback, though.  To assist us in identifying the issues, please inform us immediately when you experience problems connecting to the wireless network again.  Our IT staff will then be able to conduct a more thorough investigation.

(Feb 18/14)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 29/14) Hello,

I frequently study at the HSL and have noticed that the Silent Study Area gets cold that I see some students wearing their jacket to study. With the increasing lower temperature outside, my hands and body are still cold at the end of the day when I leave from the library. Is it possible to perhaps turn up the heat as sometimes its hard to concentrate due to the area being a bit cold.

Thank you!

Library response:

Thanks for taking the time to contact us about your concern. You are correct; there are several areas of the Health Sciences Library that have been uncomfortably cold this winter. We have contacted engineering services, but there is little they can do. The age and inefficiencies in the building make it difficult to regulate the temperatures, especially during extreme weather conditions outside. Regulating the temperature in patient areas is a higher priority. I am hoping the worst weather is behind us. Please feel free to contact me directly if you would like to discuss this in more detail

 

(Feb 6/14)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Temperature, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 26/14) Please fix the rattling intake fan on the ceiling of entrance level of the library. It is on the west side of the floor near the lounge chairs. It is quite annoying.

Thanks

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this to our attention. The lounge area at the entrance is not actually part of the library. I will forward your concern to facilities management and ask that they take care of it as soon as possible.

(Jan 27/14)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

The fan is not near the entrance. It is near the area where the leather lounge chairs are on the same level as the library checkout desk. (2014-01-28)

Thank you for responding. We will investigate. Please contact me directly (mckinn@mcmaster) so that I can gather more precise information about this problem. Regards, Jennifer McKinnell, Director, Health Sciences Library. mckinn (2014-01-28)


Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 17/14) Can we download Mozilla Firefox or Google Chrome as an alternate web browser onto the computers in HSL? The entire school is now using google for our McMaster email and I know many students use google docs for group work. Every time I use either of these services they prompt me to download a modern web browser as the website wont work properly on IE. At first I thought this was just a competitive strategy from Google but google docs seems to experience a lot of lag when Im using IE. Additionally, Ive tried to access OscarPlus from IE and been unable to connect- when I called UTS they suggested I try it on Mozilla and sure enough it worked fine.

Library response:

Thanks very much for your feedback.  I agree the lack of browser selection options is a problem in the Health Sciences Library.  For this reason, we are planning to add IE, Firefox and Chrome to the desktops over the next few weeks.  In the interim, I recommend borrowing one of our laptops from the Circulation Desk.  It has multiple browser options including Firefox.

(Jan 17/14)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 4/13) There should be available water fountains in HSL or the surrounding area. For students studying in the library for long periods of time this is very inconvenient. The water fountain on the first floor has been out of service for a very long time, and has shown no improvement. Every other library on campus has a water fountain on each floor.

Library response:

I share your frustration about the water fountain in the Health Sciences Library. Unfortunately, there is an issue with the plumbing in this area and the water is unsafe for drinking. This is a larger issue with the plumbing in the wall behind the water fountain. Building management and the Health and Safety office have not been able to find a workable solution. Until that happens, the fountain will remain closed.

The water in the library washrooms is safe for drinking. The accessible washrooms on both the upper and lower levels have faucets that can accommodate large water bottles. There are also drinking water taps available in the hospital cafeteria.

Please feel free to contact me directly if you have any other questions. Thank you.

(Dec 6/13)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 17/13) Please clean the downstairs and upstairs washrooms more often. There is often litter on the floor and an unhygienic scent when you enter.

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this to our attention. Earlier in the summer we made arrangements to have the library washrooms cleaned more frequently on the weekends. It seems that from time to time, this new cleaning schedule is not followed. I will investigate right away. Please contact us again if the problem persists.

(Nov 20/13)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 23/13) I have 2 issues with the Health Sciences Library the WIFI delay and the lack of seating around the midterm season.
1.The WIFI is very slow in the Health Sciences Library to the point of being unable to access Avenue to Learn. I prefer to use my laptop because I am able to study without any distractions in the private cubicle type desks. I am requesting that the WIFI slow down be addressed or that some desk top computers be placed in the cubicles so that students that require less distraction may study productively.
2.It has become difficult to find a cubicle during and after midterms when studies increase concequentially the cafeteria use as study space has increased. I am requesting more cubicles in the HSL and more access to electrical plugs in the cafeteria for times when the HLS is full.

Library response:

Please accept my apology for not responding sooner. It’s taken us a bit of time to investigate your concerns. The campus wireless network is managed centrally by University Technology Services (UTS). We have determined that we are unable to fix the problem locally so we have passed your concerns along UTS.

We have also investigated the possibility of adding more seats but unfortunately, there is no additional space to add temporary cubicles without compromising safety.

In terms of your suggestion regarding electrical plugs in the cafeteria, we have passed your suggestion along to Hamilton Health Sciences. The Hospital Cafeteria falls under their jurisdiction. Please feel free to contact me directly if you would like to discuss any of this in more detail. Thank you.

 

(Nov 13/13)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Sep 20/13) Could the web browser in HSL be replaced by Firefox or Chrome? Firefox is the default browser in Innis and it would be great if HSL had a better option than Internet Explorer. It would also be nice if Avenue and Student Mail were bookmarked since nearly all students use those sites.

Library response:

Thanks very much for your feedback.  I agree the lack of browser selection options has been a problem in the Health Sciences Library.  For this reason, we are planning to add IE, Firefox and Chrome to the Library computers over the next few weeks.  There will be no default; you will select the browser of choice.  Stay tuned.

(Sep 26/13)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Sep 15/13) Hi,

The computers in HSL have been freezing with almost every PDF that I open. Is there anything that can be done to ensure that the software operates correctly?

Also, the web browser freezes when more than three or four tabs are open. If youre trying to reference multiple resources this can get very frustrating. Is there anything that can be done?

Thanks!

Library response:

As a fellow user of PDF, multiple browser sessions and tabs, I can appreciate how frustrating this can be. The Systems’ staff in the Health Sciences Library was unable to recreate the scenario using the computers located in our Learning Commons.  We are interested in resolving the problem so our IT staff will contact you directly for more information to allow for a more in-depth investigation.

(Sep 16/13)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Aug 26/13) I think that the No smelly food or meals in the library rule needs to be better enforced. Ive seen the signs around the library, however I dont think they are effective. I was studying in the Reading Pavilion when an older woman (didnt look like a student) came in to have her lunch. She proceeded to open up and eat a can of sardines. The smell was distracting to say the least, and it lingered in the air for some time afterwards. As a student, I have no problem with people eating lunches in the library, and although it should be common sense not to eat such odorous food in a public space dedicated to quiet study, the reality is that some individuals remain oblivious to the way others are affected.

Library response:

Thank you for the feedback on our food policy. I am sorry your experience in our library was not pleasant. We are in the process to re-vamping our signage and our enforcement efforts for the library food policy. The new information will be available after Labour Day. In the meantime, if you have another unpleasant experience in our space, please come and speak to a library staff member who will help to address the problem. Thanks again for your feedback.

(Aug 26/13)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Aug 1/13) Hi there,

Would it be possible for the newest Java Update to be installed on the computers in HSL? Certain online learning systems employ Java and they are currently nonfunctional on the computers without the installed update. Many thanks!

Library response:

It is our intention to have the newest Java Update installed on all of our computers before September. In fact, most of the work is already complete. Please let us know if there are specific computers in the library that are causing issues and we will investigate further. I apologize for any inconvenience this has caused. Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

(Aug 16/13)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jun 27/13) It is mind boggling how McMaster does not invest in internet access to the library.
I have read complaint after complaint about the speed of access to library, and yet,
nothing seems to be done to fix this problem.

I have spent countless hours trying to get work done off campus. The access to
library on -line is simply impossible. I have to be on campus to get my work done.
This defeats the purpose of working from home.
The cost to me is taking a day off work plus travel and parking.

I know that this problem can and should be solved so that students can do their work
from home.

I cannot get access from my work-place nor from home. Magically, I can get access to
almost any other website.
There is a severe bottleneck in the McMaster sysemt and I would like to know what is
being done to fix this serious problem

Library response:

I understand your frustration, and share it. The particular issue is not one of speed, it's about connectivity, specifically for users off-campus coming in via DSL lines. We know that much, but what has made this issue so elusive is that the problems are neither persistent, nor consistenly replicatable. We have taken numerous steps to mitigate the issue, but as yet have been unable to make much of a dent. We are working with UTS and others on campus. I agree that there is a bottleneck here for this particular traffic stream, but finding the cause/source has been thus far challenging.

I should repeat here the one known solution: simply hit reload on the page. Typically, this problem manifests itself as the browser just spinning and spinning with nothing loading. If one has waited 7-8 seconds and nothing has loaded, it never will, so just hit reload. In my experience, this resolves the issue within two or three clicks. Not ideal, but at least it gets things moving again.

One last note: there are major upgrades occurring this summer to the network backbone for the campus, so hopefully many benefits will result from that work.

(Aug 1/13)
Answered by: Dale Askey (Associate University Librarian, Library Learning Technologies)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 1/13) I have a complaint, while trying to study the workers fixing part of he library are extremely loud and obnoxious...and its in the very silent section of the library where they should be more considerate. I get that they need to communicate in order to finish their work but theyre close to each other and dont need to be so loud, especially when half of what theyre saying arent even work related but jokes/laughter. Its really bothersome when one is trying to study for a midterm/exam.

Library response:

Thanks for letting us know.  A staff member went down and spoke to the workers and we also checked later in the day.  The inappropriate noise seems to have stopped, but please let us know if this happens again.  The irony is that we are in the middle of a "Respect the Place, Share the Space" campaign, and we seem to be adding to the noise problems :-(

We knew that the repairs were going to be disruptive to our students who are trying to study in our space, especially those using the graduate student room and the silent study area.  The company will be working over the weekend to try and get this finished as soon as possible. 

Thanks for your patience, and please let library staff know if this or other problems arise -- help by being our eyes and ears -- and noses!

 

(Mar 1/13)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 1/13) I have noticed over the past 5 months that both ladies washrooms in health science library are incredibly dirty inside the stalls, particularly the toilets and inside the hand dryers. Graffiti on the back of doors is also a problem, some of it is offensive.

I am wondering if there is some way more frequent rounds of these facilities can be made to keep such high traffic facilities cleaner?

Library response:

Thanks for bringing these issues to our attention.  We did contact housekeeping in the Health Sciences Centre a while ago, and thought that the graffiti had been dealt with.  The washrooms in the Health Sciences Library are among the busiest in the building and they are cleaned regularly.  However, we are definitely following up on your concerns.

(Feb 4/13)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 28/13) There are often people who are clearly not students or HHSC employees that utilize the Health Science Library on a daily basis and can be disruptive to students by either shouting / making unnecessary noise or taking up valuable study space at peak periods. It would be great if staff could take more of an active role in addressing these situations. At the very least, by stepping in when a non-member of the HSL is actively disrupting other HSL users.

Library response:

Could you please give me some more details on where these people are being disruptive?  As part of our new Respect the Place/Share the Space campaign, Library staff, including myself, are doing daily walk-arounds.  However, we haven't seen anyone shouting.  If you see this happening, please let one of the library staff know so that we can address the problem immediately.

 

We are a public institution, so are open to anyone who needs to use our resources. However, respectful use of the space is expected from everyone.

 

Thanks for working with me on this,

 

Liz

 

We are aware that the group study rooms can get very noisy.  Unfortunately, noise carries and the rooms act as echo chambers.  We are investigating soundproofing to a few of the rooms, hopefully over the summer, to see if that will help contain the noise.  However, if groups are particularly boistrous, please let a library staff member know and we will remind them to respect the place and share the space.  Thanks!

(Jan 28/13)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

I have also experienced this, usually when in a study room. People in group study rooms can, sometimes, be very loud. (2013-02-01)


Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 30/12) The internet explorer installed on the computers of the HS library is certainly outdated. The functions that students often use, such as google docs and other productivity tools, are not fully supported by the current version of the internet explorer. And, to my knowledge, this version will soon be obsolete to many other websites and companies such as Microsoft itself. Please consider updating the internet browser (to either Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox) and bring the computers up to the modern standard.

Library response:

Thank you for bringing your concern to our attention.  The problem has been identified and resolved so most functionality within Google Docs is now working.  The library has the latest version of Internet Explorer that is supported by Windows XP operating system.  We will be upgrading to Windows 7 in the summer and our intention is to offer additional Internet browser options as well.  

(Mar 13/13)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 9/12) My suggestion is whether the light in self study space in Health Science Library could be lighter. I consider that most students feel eyes uncomfortable due to the dim light especially in the evening.

Library response:

My apologies for the delay in responding -- it has been very busy in the Health Sciences Library lately with  a flood and ceiling repairs in the entrance and a major event in the reading pavilion.  I'm not quite sure which area you are referring to, but assume it might be the quiet and silent study areas.  When the Library was renovated, it went "green" for lighting and there have been some unexpected side effects.  We will put a work order in to see if the lighting levels can be increased.  Thanks for letting us know.

(Nov 19/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 12/12) Please let us know who to correctly contact for technical issues. After being told to call one person who never returned my call and waiting for a week or two. I came into the library and spoke to someone who went out of his way to help me and emailed me to make sure I got everything working. If I had known to contact him directly our lab would have not had to wait for weeks to fix our internet issues. Please put a contact sheet on your website. Thanks again Shanni.

Library response:

Thanks for the feedback.  I’m sorry to hear that you did not receive assistance in a timely fashion though I’m happy that the Systems department was able to help in the end.  The best way to contact the Health Sciences Library for assistance is to call the Information Desk at 905-525-9140 x22327 or email us at hslib@mcmaster.ca. They will then connect you to the appropriate department or person.  The library also has a contact us page.  In order to investigate your experience, please contact me.  Neera Bhatnagar, Head of Systems, Health Sciences Library

(Oct 16/12)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems & Public Services, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 10/12) Hello,
I am sending this suggestion in response to the lack of available study space in the health sciences library. I realize that there have been additions to mills and thode in regards to studying areas, however it is obvious that the health science library is also in need of additions. During exam time the library is always full, yet I am posting this suggestion in october and there are already people having to study on the floor. People enjoy studying in the health sciences library and therefore it would be nice if more desks were made available in the quiet and silent study areas.

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to share your suggestion. We are fortunate that the Health Sciences Library has recently been renovated. As part of this renovation we added seating to both the upper and lower levels of the library. The downside to this recent renovation is that it will be a while before we can undertake another significant reorganization of library space. However, we do recognize that seating is a major problem and we are investigating where we might be able to add some more seating on the lower level. We hope to add more seats, suitable for individual study, before the end of term.

(Oct 24/12)
Answered by: Lynn Schneider (Supervisor, Circulation & Collection Maintenance, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 3/12) I am wondering if it would be possible to supply power outlets to the small table made for 6 people in the reserve room; there are currently no accessible plugs for laptops.

Library response:

Thank you for your suggestion.  However, those six tables were deliberately left without power to be used by patrons who want to sit and read the books in the Reserve Reading Room.  There are multiple plugs throughout that room and the Library.

I see that you have identified yourself as a graduate student.  Are you aware that we have an FHS Graduate Student Study Room on the lower level, with seven carrels and access to plugs at all of them?

(Oct 3/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Sep 8/12) I want to recommend a referencing software, known as mendley.It is far more easier and user-friendly compared to refworks. Moreover refworks has lot of issues for off-campus users. Mendley has lots of updated features like free sharing of references which makes it more helpful for a cross country research. I request you to kindly have a look into this issue.

http://www.mendeley.com/compare-mendeley/

Library response:

Thanks for your suggestion to consider replacing RefWorks with Mendeley.  We are certainly aware of this product.  However, we have licensed RefWorks through OCUL (Ontario Council of University Libraries) who agree on joint products and get good prices as a result.  We simply can't afford to license a separate product on our own.  Sorry!  In the meantime, you can use the free version of Mendeley which comes with lots of neat features including mobile access, although you are limited to 50 MB of storage space.

(Oct 16/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jun 27/12) hello, i say mice on different occasions since last year in healthscience library; another one popped last week when studying downstairs when it was all quiet; i think because the garbage is not emptied on daily basis during the summer ; would it be possible to allocate some resources towards a better rodent termination; would really appreciate it

Library response:

We have regular pest control in the library and the garbage is collected every night.  However, allowing patrons to bring food into the library is a challenge.  Since both pest control and cleaning are handled centrally in the Health Sciences Centre, I will alert the appropriate folks to check this out.  If you could let us know where you were studying, it would be very helpful.

Thanks for the additional information.  We will certainly be contacting the cleaning company with your observations and suggestions!

 

(Jun 27/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

hello, mice were seen in the medicine room and the Carrels when you go downstairs thank you (2012-06-28)

also just to add; i really did notice garbage from the day before ; and also the carpet is rarely cleaned ; we as students have noticed that the staff that cleans only picks up things left on carrols and tables but nobody wipes the tables or cleans the carpet; i think once a month would make the library much more sanitary (2012-06-28)

Hello, i just want to say , i really appreciate your efforts! the library is much cleaner now; and the garbages are being emptied on daily basis, THANKS Thank you so much for letting us know that the library is cleaner. Complaints from our users, particularly with details, really do have an effect! -- Liz Bayley, DIrector (2012-07-12)


Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(May 25/12) Hi, is it possible to turn up the temp here a bit? The library has turned to be too cold to stay for long time studying, despite that Ive put on thick sweater. Im hearing coughing, runny noses and sneezing all around.
Its also good for energy saving.

Thanks!

Library response:

I just walked around the library.  I found that some areas are a bit cool but some are warm and stuffy.  No parts seemed to be cold but I didn't sit for any period of time.  Since you identified yourself as a graduate student, I did check out the FHS Graduate Student study room which was a pleasant temperature but noisy due to the air ventilation. 

Unfortunately, the temperature in the library is controlled centrally and varies greatly between areas, times of day, day of the week and season of the year.  However, if you could be a bit more specific about the area where you were sitting we could get engineering to investigate. 

As for the coughing, runny noses and sneezing, sometimes I think we should rename ourselves as the Sick Sciences Library; however, we are not allowed to screen for infectious diseases before admission to our space.  Evidence shows that you should wash your hands frequently and not put your hands anywhere near your face: http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/cold-guide/cold-prevention-hand-washing

(May 25/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 11/12) Dear Medical Library Staff:
I attended your medical library this evening, and after working out the system as a Guest Login, and the print system that you utilize I was hit by an inability to print the journal documents that I had searched. While originally informed that EquiPrint would re-imburse for the articles that didnt physically get printed (due to running out of paper without warning ! that seems odd for such a sophisticated system), your front staff requested input from your technical support. I just wanted to thank you (and mostly Shani) for recovering the unprinted PDF downloaded journal articles that I had searched for my research. The time saved alone was much appreciated, and he handled the situation, managed to print my documents elsewhere, and my travel, search and evening were not lost while the system remained down.
I sometimes think that people dont get thanked enough when they come through for someone.
SO THANKS AGAIN !!!!!
Dr. Berge

Library response: Thanks for letting us know about Shani's exemplary service.  Technology is wonderful when it works and painful when it doesn't, which is why our staff, particularly our systems staff, puts people's needs first.  (Apr 12/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 28/12) Hello, I am a person that suffers from cologne or perfume induced headaches. I realize that the libraries have a scent-free policy but my suggestion is that McMaster libraries make students more aware of this policy. There are no visible signs and I myself did not realize there was such a policy until I asked.

Thanks for considering this request!

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this to my attention.  McMaster does indeed have a guideline around scent-free awareness.  Your message has prompted me to remind everyone working in the library about using unscented products in consideration of their fellow staff and patrons.  Creating a respectful shared environment is very important, and includes reducing noise, odours and garbage.  We will be posting more signs and planning a campaign to raise awareness of all of these issues.

(Apr 1/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 24/12) The silent study space needs to be monitored. People are not following the rules and rudely talking. Librarians should make attempts to remove those individuals.

Library response:

I am sorry to hear that other students are interfering with your ability to study in the silent study area. We are currently monitoring the area on a regular basis and are working on a plan to do this more frequently during the exam period. It is important to note that the silent zone is located on the lower level at the back of the library. It is our intention to monitor this particular area most closely. However we do not have the staff resources to have a constant presence in this area and unfortunately noise often rises again after the staff person leaves.  The Regulations Governing Behaviour in the Health Sciences Library (http://hsl.mcmaster.ca/about/policies/behaviour.html) explicitly states that “Conversation is not permitted in the Silent Study area on the lower floor” and outlines consequences. Despite our best efforts we can’t always ensure complete compliance with the policy.  It is our expectation that students will self-monitor when necessary and will let each other know when noise is disturbing their studying.  In addition, we rely on signage to designate this area as a silent study area.

(Mar 26/12)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 23/12) Ive been studying in the silent study area (downstairs) over the past semester and the lights keep turning on and off at apparently random intervals. It becomes very distracting.

Library response: When the Health Sciences Library was renovated, every attempt was made to make it as "green" as possible.  As a result, most lights were put on motion or light sensors.  We put the study carrels by the windows to give you natural light. Sunshine coming in those windows, especially in the afternoon, is what is causing the lights to turn on and off. Unfortunately, there is nothing we can do about this on days when the sunlight alters in intensity intermittently.  Sorry!   (Mar 23/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 15/12) Is it possible to have an entrance to HSL from the outside, instead of having the sole entrance from HSC. Its not only convenient but it also isnt very logical going upstairs into HSC only to go downstairs again to the study carrels. I think having double doors in the reading pavillion emergency exit would be very beneficial in addressing that, but also maintaining the needed level of quietness.

Library response:

The main floor of the Health Sciences Centre is actually the second floor, which is why the entrance is located there.  We report directly to the Faculty of Health Sciences and support their faculty, staff and students.  It wouldn't make sense for all of them to have to go downstairs and outside to come into the Health Sciences Library. 

We don't have the staff or the security in place to set up another entrance for non-FHS users, so sorry, you are going to have to climb some stairs.  The good news is that stair climbing uses more calories per minute than jogging, reduces cardiovascular risks and increases leg strenghth and joint flexibility!

(Mar 15/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

I agree with this comment. However the mills library also have two entrances and it functions fine. (2012-03-18)

The Mills Learning Commons is a staffed area, and the IT Support student assistants monitor access during core hours, with security guards being hired for hours when Mills is closed but the Commons area is still open.  The Reading Pavilion in the Health Sciences Library is different - it is not a staffed area with computers. Liz Bayley (Director/Head of Systems) (2012-03-19)


Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 31/12) I just had a very helpful experience with a staff member at the Health Sciences Library, I think her name was Cheyenne, she went above and beyond to help me with a printing problem that I had. Keep employees like this at all cost, they make the library a helpful and enjoyable place to study.

Library response: Thank you so much for letting me know.   Cheyenne is one of our great student assistants.  I have passed your message on to her with my thanks for her wonderful work. (Jan 31/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 2/12) I find it to be extremely hot in the reserve room and actually left to find a cooler place to study

Library response: Thanks for letting us know.  I have just checked the room myself, and although I didn't find it "extremely hot" it was rather warm.  The air flow in the front areas of the Health Sciences Library were adjested a few weeks ago resulting in uncomfortable temperatures in the enclosed areas including the Reserve Reading Room.  We have a work order in to Engineering to investigate. (Jan 2/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Temperature, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 22/11) high counter top for print release computers! Just a thought

Library response: Thanks for the suggestion.  When the Health Sciences Library was renovated, accessibility was a major consideration.  This is why we have the print release stations at the present counter height.  You can always print at one of the copiers either in the Reserve Reading Room on the upper level or in the copier room on the lower level if you prefer to stand. (Dec 23/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 6/11) Please ask the HSL to turn on the heaters in the reading room a bit higher during the winter. Its freezing during the winter and there are heaters which arent really used so a lot of people wear their coats.

Library response: Unfortunately, there is no separate heating system for the reading room or even for the Health Sciences Library as a whole.  The heating is building-wide, the Health Sciences Centre is a very big building, and it takes a long time to adjust to major temperature changes such as happened last week.  If you mean the Reading Pavilion, that area is even more challenging due to its size and the large windows.  I can only suggest that on cold days you find an interior location to sit, where the view might not be as spectacular but the temperature will be warmer. (Dec 12/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Temperature, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 27/11) Please install Asian Character Font packages on your public computers! This was not an issue in previous years but is troublesome when Asian characters display as boxes.

Library response:

Thanks for bringing this to our attention. Our systems staff is looking into this.

UPDATE: The Asian character fonts are still available on the public computers on the lower level and in the Reserve Reading Room on the upper level.  When the computers in the upper level Learning Commons were upgraded this summer this feature was missed, but this will be remedied in the near future.  In the meantime, please use the other public computers if you need to read material with Asian characters.  Thanks!

(Oct 28/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 26/11) I met with a HSL librarian yesterday for a literature search consultation. She was so helpful and so constructive that I really feel the need to express my appreciation. She took the time to address my concerns in a systematic method that left me feeling fully equipped to tackle future literature searches very efficiently and thoroughly.

Thank you also to the librarians who were unable to help me but happy to pass along my request to the next individual.

Library response: Thank you for letting us know that you are getting the help you need in the Health Sciences Library, particularly that it has helped you to build your own skill set in an important area. (Oct 26/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Sep 18/11) Can you put up signs so that people remain quiet at the library? I dont appreciate the fact that people are on their cellphones walking up and down the stacks or at the cubicles talking. I am looking for a quiet place to study, not to hear about last nights escapades or grading schemes.

Library response:

I'm sorry that other users were interfering with your ability to study.  The Library can be a bit noisy at times, but there are areas dedicated to quiet and silent study and clear signs to remind users to restrict their noise in those areas.  The silent zone is on the lower level at the back of the library.  I personally walk around the library regularly and remind people in the silent area to stop their conversations. To be honest, people who disrespect their fellow users in this way would probably not take any notice of additional signs.

(Sep 18/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jul 20/11) July 19/11
- for staff at circulation desk, particularly when close to the reserve room, to be aware of volume of their converstation. It travels into quiet study area of the reserve room. Its also good for staff to set a model of behaviour for patrons to follow!

Printed suggestion left in the Suggestion Box

Library response:

Thank you for your feedback. I have discussed this matter with the staff. Going forward, they will do their best to keep conversations to a minimum. You are correct in your statement about modeling good behaviour. Unfortunately, because there is no door on the area sound travels from both the lobby and service desk. Jennifer McKinnell, Head of Public Services (mckinn@mcmaster.ca)

(Aug 24/11)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library),Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(May 25/11) It seems as though there have been recent upgrades to the HSL website that has removed the quick search feature from the home page. I found this very convenient to find particular material that I was looking for. I would like to suggest restoring this feature to the home page. Thank you.

Library response: The HSL webiste has not had any major upgrades recently and still has a search box.  However, what I think you may be looking for is a quick search of the library catalogue.  The McMaster Libraries catalogue had a major change at the beginning of May, with a temporary user interface in place.  Once this interface has been finalized, we will be adding the library search box back to our main page.  Thanks for letting us know that this is a useful feature. (Jun 8/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 18/11) Dear Sir/Madam,

Could you please help by doing something with the airconditioning system in the grad study room [1B21]. Everday starting at 5:oopm it is cold freezing in the room.

Thanks and best

Library response: Thank you for your comment. We have spoken with engineering and it turns out the thermostat in that room was set at a very cool temperature. We have adjusted the temperature and we hope this solves the problem. Please feel free to contact me directly if the problem persists. Jennifer McKinnell, Head of Public Services (mckinn@mcmaster.ca, x24381). (Apr 18/11)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 5/11) http://library.mcmaster.ca/equipment/locations is the page showing Innis equipment, power bars etc.

Library response: Thanks!  I will get more details on this, since Innis seems to be the only campus library offering this service. (Apr 6/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 29/11) Like Innis, have power bars, extension cords, etc for rent. 1 hour time limit, accessed through scanning the student card. See Innis for supplies and setup. (Printed suggestion, entered by staff, March 29, 2011)

Library response: I was not aware of this and cannot find any  information on the Innis website.  I assume you mean for  loan, not for rent?  Whatever, I simply don't have the budget or the staff to consider this in addition to our laptop and projector loan service.  Sorry! (Mar 29/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

Please refrain from using childish vocabulary (ie. whatever), in order to be little students for suggestions of improvement. As all students are just looking to better their library experience and it is rather insulting to have suggestions met with such a harsh tone by library administration. Thank-you!!! (2011-03-31)

REPLY TO COMMENT: Hm... the tone wasnt meant to be childish or harsh, just a quick reply stating the facts. Neither the original suggester or you gave me any contact information to follow up. Email me at bayleyl@mcmaster.ca or phone me at ext 22545 if you want to discuss this further. I certainly dont want you to feel belittled!  Liz Bayley, Director, Health Sciences Library (2011-03-31)

Follow up comment: Seriously? It must cost like 13 dollars for a simple power bar. buy 10, that makes 130$. I expect that you could probably find 130$ in the budget. REPLY TO COMMENT:OK, so someone tell me why the library should be providing power bars? What are they being used for? We already lend laptops and projectors, but they come with their own cords. Liz Bayley, Director, Health Sciences Library. (2011-04-04)


Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 17/11) There should be a water fountain upstairs. It wouldnt be stretch to put it by the washrooms. (Printed suggestion, entered by staff, March 17, 2011)

Library response:

We are very fortunate to have kept a drinking fountain on the lower level of the Health Sciences Library -- I assume you are aware of that one?  Public water fountains are rare features these days, and getting rarer.  As far as I know, we have the only one in the building outside the cafeteria. Unfortunately, they aren't being installed anywhere else so you will need to use the downstairs one or the taps in the washrooms or go to the cafeteria.

(Mar 18/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 7/11) Love the grad. student study rooms. Makes it really easy for us who need to study year round, not just seasonally!

Library response:

Thanks very much for the positive feedback.  It was an experiment so I'm pleased that graduate students are utilizing the room.  Neera Bhatnagar, Coordinator of Research & Graduate Education Support, Health Sciences Library

(Mar 11/11)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 24/11) I love Health Sciences library and have been studying there for years with no real issues. However, when I was on the upstairs floor one day at the tables near the offices, I was eating a sandwich while studying. One of the staff? or people working at the offices? was walking by and really rudely asked me to put away my food because it was not permitted in the library. I told him that I had been doing this with no problems before but he was very abrupt and insistent I put it away. It was rather embarrassing and he was very rude. I looked at the policy online and found that cold food is allowed, so I was hoping that all the staff or people who work in the library could be informed of this. Thanks.

Library response: You are indeed allowed to eat cold food, including sandwiches, in the Library.  Hot and fragrant foods are not permitted because fellow users have complained about food odours.  We will review our food policies to ensure that they are correctly and courteously enforced.  My apologies for your unfortunate experience. (Feb 24/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 23/11) Please replace the pencil sharpener PLEASE! Thank you

Library response:

I assume you mean the one in the Reserve Reading Room?  We have ordered a replacement.  In the meantime, there is a sharpener at the right front of the printing counter by the Learning Commons on the upper level which is in good working order.

Update:  the sharpener has arrived, we are just waiting for Engineering to install it.

UPDATE:  It's back!

(Jan 24/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 17/11) 8 Jan 11
To whom it may concern:
why is the media rm always cold? Summer, winter, morning, afternoon, evening? in the summer I need to bring a sweater, in the winter I may as well keep hat gloves & parka on!

Library response: There are major problems with heating throughout the Library, including in staff offices.  When the temperature changes quickly and drastically the way it did this weekend, it takes a long time for the building to heat up or cool down.  We have a request into Engineering to check the temperature throughout the Library.  (Jan 17/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 17/11) More tables for study in the reference room (get rid of TVs)

Library response: We are working on revamping the equipment and arrangement of the room.  It is a priority project, but takes some time as many of the AV materials are still included on course reading lists. (Jan 17/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 17/11) Please Designate the reference room as silent or quiet study

Library response:

I assume you mean the Reserve Reading Room?  It is already designated as a quiet study area, and there is a large sign in the entrance reminding people of this.  Unfortunately, because there is no door on the area sound does travel from the lobby and service desk.

(Jan 17/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 15/11) Please extend the hours of operation of the Health Science library on weekdays. Extended hours would benefit so many students.

Library response: The Health Sciences Library is already open longer hours than any of the other libraries on campus with the exception of the Learning Commons at Mills which is open 24/7.  Unfortunately, I simply don't have the funding necessary to extend the hours on weekdays.  There are also security issues with my staff closing up and going home late at night.  Most of our resources are available online and other material can be borrowed so that being in the library is not necessary to complete most of your work.  (Jan 15/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Hours, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 15/10) Find a way to control the lighting system in the cubicle areas because during the day the lights flicker on and off. I know this is a way to converse energy when there is enough light provide from outside but when the lights are regularly turning on and off every 10-15 min its rather annoying and in some people (like myself) it can cause headaches.

Library response: I realize that the light-sensitive lighting is annoying, particularly on days when there are sunny and cloudy periods.  We have asked that this be changed, but unfortunately there is not an easy solution .  I will submit another engineering request, quoting your words and emphasizing the adverse effects on your health resulting from the lights. (Dec 15/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 29/10) Although the Health Science library is one of the better ones on campus it is in completely biased toward other faculty students. Other faculties are not able to book a study room in advance yet Health Science students can still book a study room in other libraries, this is completely unfair. It should be either all faculties should be able to book a study room in advance, or it should be entirely on a first come first serve bases.

Library response:

The renovations to the Health Sciences Library were largely funded by the Faculty of Health Sciences to meet the special needs of their students.  The Health Sciences Library reports directly to the Faculty of Health Sciences; the other libraries report separately, so I cannot speak to their advance booking policy.

A survey we ran last week showed that over 2/3 of the students in the Health Sciences Library come from other Faculties, so it is indeed a popular place.  Our computers, laptops and all open study spaces are available and heavily used by all students.  The study rooms are also available to all McMaster students, with the exception that they can only be booked by FHS students from one week to one day in advance; they can be booked by any student for the current day. 

(Nov 29/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 17/10) Have a basic first aid kit (band-aids & alcohol swabs!)

(Written comments submitted through our suggestion box - Nov. 17th/10)

Library response:

Unfortunately, there is no budget to supply first aid materials to our patrons.  Please consider doing what I do and carry a couple of bandaids in your purse or wallet.

(Dec 16/10)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison),Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 8/10) Please dont turn off the light when there is still 15 minutes till library closes. we still have 15 mins left to be here. Thank you.

(printed suggestion, entered by staff, November 8, 2010)

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this to our attention. When we posted our closing time as 11:30 we expected that this would be the time that staff would be able to lock the doors and leave the premises. Your are correct in pointing out that this posted time is misleading. It suggests that students can continue to use the library facilities until 11:30, which is not really the case. We apologize for this confusion. We have reposted our Monday-Thursday closing time as 11:15. Closing times for other days of the week have also been adjusted.

Jennifer McKinnell, Head of Public Services, mckinn@mcmaster.ca

(Nov 17/10)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 2/10) Would it be possible to try a computer queue system? If there was a clear sign or roped off area - something to the effect of: line up here for next available computer. I think it would be very helpful at really busy hours in the library. I know it seems simple, but often times I am waiting to set up on a computer and someone bardges past and grabs one before I get to it. I think it would help keep things friendly. Thanks for your time.

Library response:

Thank you for the suggestion.  After careful consideration, the Systems Department determined that establishing a queue is not feasible in the current layout.  The Learning Commons on the upper floor of the library is not a contained room with controlled entrances so it would be difficult to prevent users from approaching the computers from different angles.  We find the busiest time of the day is between 10am to 4pm so you may find it easier to access library computers outside of these hours. Also note that there are additional library computers on the lower level outside of the Heersink Reading Pavilion or students can sign out a laptop to use in the library.   During the peak hours, you may want to consider using one of the campus Student Computer Labs or visiting the other campus libraries as an alternative http://library.mcmaster.ca/equipment/locations. Neera Bhatnagar, Head of Systems, Health Sciences Library

(Nov 3/10)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 12/10) in reserve room would be nice to have a sign saying quiet area - since most are there to read and cannot take the resources out if people are noisy.
(Written suggestion placed in the Suggestion Box, date not provided)

Library response:

The reserve area on the upper level of the Health Sciences Library has been designated as quiet study (see our website at: http://hsl.mcmaster.ca/services/study/index.html). This means that conversation may occur in this room, but that voices should be kept low. Lately, the library has been very busy and I suspect some students are using this space for group work rather than individual quiet study. Your suggestion to post a sign is a good one. The library will investigate where and how such a sign can be posted.

Thank you for bringing this to our attention.

 Jennifer McKinnell, Head of Public Services (mckinn@mcmaster.ca)

(Oct 15/10)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 12/10) We need a scanner :)
(Written suggestion placed in the Suggestion Box, date not provided)

Library response: In the spring 2010, we thought PrintSmart, the new printer/copier initiative, introduced in September would have addressed this.  The Sharp devices are capable of scanning however PrintSmart is unable to offer this functionality at this time.  According to the their website (http://printsmart.mcmaster.ca/students/faqs.html), this functionality will not be available until the campus Access Copyright license has been re-negotiated to include this option. In the meantime, public-use scanners are available in the other libraries on campus and at the McMaster University Student Centre (http://library.mcmaster.ca/equipment/scanning). Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems, Health Sciences Library) (Oct 13/10)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 1/10) feedback
- computer area that is designated as quiet

(Written suggestion placed in the Suggestion Box, date not provided)

Library response: It is interesting that you are making this suggestion.  When we first set up the silent study area, users didn't want electrical outlets in the study carrels in that aressince they felt that people using computers weren't being quiet.  We have since added the outlets to the 96 carrels.  So if you want to use a computer in a quiet area, I suggest that you borrow one of the laptops from the circulation desk to use in the silent study area.  Of course, you need to be a McMaster student to borrow a laptop, and you didn't include anything about your status when you dropped your suggestion into the box. (Oct 1/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(May 3/10) 03/03/10

You need to get
RECYCLING Bins!

[written comment inputed by staff - C. Erskine]

Library response:

Sorry for the delay in replying - we forgot to check the physical suggestion box!

This is a great suggestion, especially since the library has a go green@HSL campaign.  I am sure you will be pleased to learn that we have a summer project to look at the whole issue of how to support reduce/reuse/recycle in the Health Sciences Library, including the identification and purchase of suitable recycling containers.  Please contact me if you want to participate in the project.

(May 3/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(May 3/10) APRIL 1, 2010

SCANNER FOR HEALTH SCI LIBRARY
(NOT A JOKE DESPITE THE DATE)

[written comment inputed by staff - C. Erskine]

Library response: Sorry for the delay in replying. I believe you are enquiring as to whether the Health Sciences Library has scanning equipment.  At present we do not offer this service however, we anticipate this will change in the fall 2010.  The University will be introducing PrintSmart – the campus copier initiative in the libraries.  It is our understanding that the new equipment will have scanning capability.  In the meantime, public-use scanners are available in the other libraries on campus and at the McMaster University Student Centre (http://library.mcmaster.ca/equipment/scanning).  Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems, Health Sciences Library) (May 4/10)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 17/10) The health sciences library offers many great services for students. Laptops, study rooms, supportive staff. Yet, if fails to ensure what every library needs, and thats silence. If you stand anywhere in health sciences library, it sounds like a part of the student centre.

The history of medicine room is an exception to this, but in a large and newly renovated library, this should not be the only exception.

I am not sure how to resolve this because the design of the health sciences library with open tables lends itself to such an environment, but perhaps having staff to remind students to be mindful of those studying could be an option.

thanks,

Library response:

We have several areas designated as quiet study space, including the History of Health and Medicine Room and the carrels at the bottom of the stairs, plus the Reserve Reading Room on the upper level.  In addition, we have a silent study area outside the History of Health and Medicine Room.

Over the past week, I have walked around the library to monitor the noise, and have found it to be much quieter than I have ever found the Student Centre!  We have reminded staff to monitor the noise too, particularly in the Silent Study area. The open design, especially the entrance and the staircase, are very challenging for noise containment.

We will be designing a sign to remind our patrons to respect the requirements of others for quiet to study.  This will certainly be in place for the next exam period in particular.

Thanks for bringing this to my attention,

Liz

(Apr 27/10)
Answered by: bannisl,Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 10/10) http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/04/09/complaint-box-the-lost-library-voice/?hp

Here is a great website I found on the New York Times website at www.nytimes.com

However, I could not access this website from the computers in the library. There appears to be some error

Library response:

Our investigation has determined there is a compatibility issue with the Adobe Flash upgrade, the New York Times website and the Internet browser used in the library.   In the past, websites have resolved these kinds of problems relatively quickly.  In the interim, you may wish to use the computers in the UTS computer labs or in the other campus libraries which are configured differently. Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems, Health Sciences Library)

(Apr 10/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 8/10) Im wondering if there could be some hand sanitizer/hand rub placed around the library? Considering the high volume of traffic and the use of computers etc by medical residents and staff, as well as patients, I think this would be a good addition to the library.

Thanks.

Library response: I agree that this would be a great idea, and it was suggested during the H1N1 flu outbreak.  However, when I inquired about the installation and stocking of dispensers, the costs were very high and  I was informed that they would have to be paid by the Library.  Unfortunately, I do not have a budget to cover the costs of public hand sanitizers, so I suggest that you do what I do and carry a small personal supply.   (Apr 8/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 18/10) I am just wondering what the general policy is for the use of the computers by people who are clearly not students at mac, and where it is available. I often see children watching cartoons, patients and staff from the hospital using the computers when there are students waiting to use them.

Library response: The Health Sciences Library is both a university library and also a hospital library for staff located at the McMaster Campus of Hamilton Health Sciences.  Thus, faculty, staff, students, hospital staff and patients regularly use our facilities to locate health information.  As a publicly funded institution, we are also a community resource.  Our policy is that the computers in the Library Learning Commons are intended for health research and educational pursuits.  During peak periods, users may be asked to vacate if they are not engaged in these activities.  IT staff regularly monitors the area often asking uses to leave when the computer are used inappropriately.  If the computers are busy, please inform staff at the Information & Circulation Desk to explore the options available.    Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems, Health Sciences Library) (Jan 22/10)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 13/10) As a frequent user of the computers in Health Sci library I was wondering if there is any maintenance or general cleaning that can be done to the keyboards themselves. Many are missing both tabs on the bottom, or have one tap missing, and the are generally in pretty bad shape. They are dusty, and food is lodged in between the letters. I think there should be either postings not to eat around the computers, or having sanitizer near the computers reminding ppl to use them.

Library response: The public computers in the Health Sciences Library are heavily used throughout the year.  As a result, they do get dirty.  The computers are checked daily and the keyboards are cleaned regularly.  A quick survey of the keyboards by our IT staff showed that they are in good working order.  There are a few with broken lifts that support the base of the keyboard however the keyboards themselves are functioning properly.  The public computers are now three years old and have held up well during that time.  Our staff frequently reminds users to refrain from eating around the computers and we will add signs to reinforce this policy as per your suggestion.   Neera Bhatnagar (Head of Systems, Health Sciences Library) (Jan 18/10)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 4/10) Make this suggestion box more visible. (Paper suggestion left in the Suggestion Box in December 2009)

Library response: There was some discussion last year about whether we even needed a physical suggestion box, since most people were using the suggestion button on the library's main web page.  It is good that you thought to look for the box and submit a suggestion!  Yes, we will try to make it more obvious to those who still prefer pen/cil and paper.  Thanks! (Jan 5/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 4/10) Stay open later on Saturdays!!! [Paper suggestion left in the Suggestion Box in December 2009]

Library response:

We used to stay open until 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays, but changed to 6:00 p.m. in September.  This matches the hours for the other McMaster libraries. 

Throughout the 2008-2009 academic year, we monitored the number of patrons in the Library, particularly in the evenings and weekends and optimized our staffing levels accordingly.  Frankly, there weren't sufficient numbers here on Saturday evenings to justify staffing the library beyond 6:00 p.m. 

(Jan 5/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Hours, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 4/10) Exam extended hours for HSL would be beneficial!!

[2 identical paper notes left in the Suggestion Box in December 2009]

Library response:

I agree that the Health Sciences Library is a wonderful place to study, but I don't have the staff to cover extra hours.  We use student assistants for later evening hours at present; however, they are often not available during exam times, since they are students too!  In addition, I would not be comfortable having them working in the library any later than 11:30.  For these reasons, extended hours are just not feasible.  Sorry!

(Jan 5/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Hours, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 4/10) Librery should access head phones. It is a very important and useful tool for study. This is the only reason why many times I have to leave this librery and go to the IAHS librery for a headphone! We can sign in and use our student card to access it in the librery just like The IAHS librery.

Library response:

I have contacted the IAHS Library to find out more information.  I am awaiting a call back as to the brand and cost of the headphones which they lend.  We do have large earphones for our multimedia materials, but they are for use on specific equipment.

We did look into the idea of lending headphones a couple of years ago, but the literature showed that sharing headphones was not a sanitary practice.  We don't have the budget to hand out free earphones, and many people have their own mini earphones which are quite cheap. 

I'll let you know what we decide.

Liz 

Update: I investigated the headphone loan service being offered at IAHS and I am pleased to announce that as of this week (February 10, 2010)  we have set up a pilot project to lend headphones from the circulation desk. 

(Jan 4/10)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 17/09) I understand the justifications for why only Health Sciences students can book study rooms but many times I have seen students who I know are in Health Sciences in them alone or with one another person working seperately on computers not involved in group work at all. Ive also talked to many students who booked them in advance just in case but many times do not use the. This abuse of priviledges will always occur if only one faculty has the right to booking a room (no matter what).

Also from what I understand the Health sciences office can book tutorail/meeting rooms on the spot in MDCL for you if you are in the Health Sciences program. However for anyone else who wishes to use these rooms it is first some first serve and
anyone from Health sciences can take it from you if they simply go to the HSC office and book it. I just think this is a big disadvantage to non-Health Sciences students especially when most universities pride themselves on fair, fully accessible campus for all students.

Library response:

We have a notice at the desk stating that group study rooms are for the use of 2 people or more.  We had a long discussion about what defines a "group" and decided on two or more - I agree that one person definitely isn't a group.  However, students book as a group then we too see only one person in a room.  But this is an honour system - maybe the second person is out of the room, or hasn't turned up yet, or has left a bit early?  What solution would you suggest? We certainly won't have library staff patrolling and peering in windows! 

Regarding your second point, we only hold a room for 15 minutes after which time it is released to anyone; we have the 15 minute grace period because many students have been held up in tutorials or clinical settings sometimes off campus. 

Abuse of privileges can always happen and I honestly don't believe it is because of the limitations on who can pre-book.  Policies are set on the assumption that students will act in a fair and professional manner. 

I have no control over the MDCL rooms, but will pass on the message.

(Dec 18/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 10/09) Why is it that you have to be a Health Sci student to book a room in advance at the Health Science Library? You dont have to be in a specific faculty to book a room in Innis, Thode or Mills. To be fair, students from any faculty should be allowed to book a room in advance at Health Science Library.

Library response: You and many others are probably not aware that the Health Sciences Library reports directly to the Faculty of Health Sciences and is separate from the University Library.  As a result, our mandate does indeed focus on the needs of the faculty and students in the Faculty of Health Sciences.  Because of the requirements of the FHS students to work in a self-directed, small group format, the Health Sciences Library was renovated to meet those needs. The only privilege these students have is the ability to pre-book the study rooms.  All other facilities and resources, including use of our collection, computers, laptops, comfortable chairs, study carrels and large group tables are open to everyone on campus. Our statistics show that over 50% of the students using the library and borrowing the laptops are non-FHS students. Study rooms are available to all McMaster students (not faculty or staff - who complain about this) on a first come first served basis if they haven't been pre-booked.
(Dec 10/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

I think this association needs to be removed or else the library should be closed to non-FHS population. It is a pain in the ass to have so many FHS focused resources just because of funding inequalities! REPLY: I find it hard to take this suggestion seriously! The Health Sciences Library is a wonderful facility, with over 50% of its users being non-FHS students. They can use the collection, the computers, the laptops, the study carrels, the Reading Pavilion, the History of Health and Medicine Room and yes, even the group study rooms! The only thing they cant do is book a study room in advance. You really think the library should be closed to non-FHS students for this reason? -- Liz Bayley, Director, Health Sciences Library (2010-03-24)


Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 11/09) Hello,

This is in response to the wireless access at Health Sci library. I rarely ever can get a lasting signal, and it has gotten so bad that I have to find other study spaces when I know I will need internet and dont want to work on a campus computer. I realize that the library is busy, but I often have this problem even early in the day when it is still quiet. And I am sure it is not only my computer, as I have used two separate computers here with the same issue - and complained along with many friends about the poor wireless connection here!

Id love it if my favourite library had better internet access. Thank you.

Library response: Thank you for your comment on improving wireless access in the library.  We appreciate the feedback and hope to continue to be your favourite library.  Accessing the Internet involves many issues so further investigations may be necessary to determine the source of the problems you are experiencing.  The Library performed a test earlier this afternoon in an attempt to replicate the problem. Our investigation showed that while we had exceeded capacity on the number of laptops in use in the library, the IT staff could successfully connect to the wireless network throughout the area.  However, we did notice that the response time was slower in some sections of the library.  I should also mention that on a number of days over the past two weeks, the entire campus has been experiencing network problems affecting both wireless and wired access.  The situation you are describing here may have occurred on one of those occasions.  If you experience problems connecting to the wireless network again, please inform us immediately.  Our IT staff will then be able to conduct a more thorough investigation. Another option is to bring a network cable along with your laptop.  Then you will be able to access the Internet using the wired connections available in the group rooms, the large e-tables and in the quiet study space http://hsl.mcmaster.ca/services/study/index.html.   Neera Bhatnagar, Head of Systems (Nov 16/09)
Answered by: Neera Bhatnagar,Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 6/09) Hello, this is in regards to e-library usage. It would be EXTREMELY convenient if new windows opened when accessing resources/databases (in particular from health science library databases). If we are trying to use a resource (example, COCHRANE, OVID etc) the window opens in your current Mac session, meaning when you are finished you cannot return to Main Mcmaster/health science resources page without hitting the back button over and over and over again (which is often not possible or feasoble based on the number of references/results viewed). This leaves us to re-enter Mac homepage, then re-enter and log into libaccess, and start the whole process over again when we need to access a new database/resource.

Is this something that is in the works? Or am i missing something here?

thanks

Library response:

OK, so here is a solution which you can use to open a link in a new window.  Instead of left clicking to open the link, right click instead (or the reverse if you use a left-handed mouse as I do).   A menu should appear with the option "Open in New Window" or "Open Link in New WIndow".  Be sure that "libaccess.lib.mcmaster.ca" still appears in the URL in the new window; some browser settings lose the proxy access when they open a new window.  I hope this makes your searching more efficient, and saves your finger and your back button!

(Nov 8/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 1/09) You should drop the rule about how only health science students can reserve rooms. I went to the Health Sciences library on Friday to reserve a room for a later time because all other study rooms were booked. There was a room available but they said I couldnt reserve it since I was not in health sciences. They suggested that I come back closer to the time and the room probably would still be available. It was not when I came back and it is really unfair that all other faculty based libraries do not have restrictions about what faculty you are in to reserve rooms but the health sciences library discriminates against other students not in health sciences. It is hard enough to even find empty space and I have been resorted to study in hall ways many times.

If you continue with this rule that only allows Health Science students to be able to reserve rooms, then you must consider making a rule for other libraries that restrict health science students from booking their rooms.

Library response:

The Health Sciences Library does indeed serve the Faculty of Health Sciences students as its primary users.  This is because the FHS educational programs require that their students work in small groups; as a result, the Library was renovated to meet their needs.  We are not discriminating against other students, including yourself, but we are trying to meet the special needs of our students.  The rooms are only bookable by students (not faculty or staff), and only for them to work in groups.

I understand your frustration in trying to find suitable study space.  There are no restrictions on any of our other facilities or services.  I don't know if health sciences students book rooms in the other libraries; I have no control over the rules for the other libraries on campus, but you could take this up with the University Library. 

(Nov 2/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Follow-up Comments:

I will forward your suggestions to the Innis Library for reply. -- Liz Bayley, Director, Health Sciences Library. (2009-11-08)


Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 20/09) My concerns are with the quality of the wireless internet in some buildings on campus. My experiences have been poor in Thode and the Health Sciences Library, recently. At peak hours, many people accessing the wireless network slows the internet speed to an observable rate.

Has anyone else noticed this? What is being done to fix it?

Library response:

Thanks for reporting this problem to us.  Thode staff reported the poor wireless connectivity to University Technology Services late last week.  A representative from UTS has visited Thode to check on the problem and has made some adjustments.  I hope that you find an improvement now.  We would appreciate it if you could make staff at theThode service desk aware if you continue to experience problems, so that we can monitor the situation and follow up with UTS.

The Health Sciences Library had a problem with one of its wireless access points in the middle of October.  That has since been fixed.  Please let me know if you are still having problems.

(Oct 20/09)
Answered by: Lynn Schneider (Supervisor, Circulation & Collection Maintenance, Health Sciences Library),Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Thode, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 16/09) The support person, for an individual in a wheel chair, expressed concern about the difficulty of entering and exiting the reading pavilion. The glass doors do not have automatic door opening features. The support person felt the door were difficult to open and close while assisting a person in a wheel chair.

Verbal comments made on Oct 15, 2009; entered by staff – C. Erskine

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this to our attention.  We will see if it is possible to add an automatic opener to one of the doors in the Reading Pavilion.  In the meantime, please ask one of our staff members to help you whenever you come into the library. 

UPDATE:  On further investigation we found that there IS an automatic door opener on the west door into the Reading Pavilion, the one closest to the bottom of the stairs but not the one more directly on the route from the elevator. 

 

(Oct 25/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 13/09) I find it difficult to read textbooks online. Causes headaches & eye strain. Also frustrating when ovid continually boots you out. Would like more hard copies or texts. Thank you!

Library response:

Thank you for providing us with this useful feedback.  We have been purchasing and subscribing to ebooks for a number of years, but in the past couple of years we have greatly expanded this collection.  We have received feedback from students that they prefer to have some books in print format.  As you mentioned, the online environment is not great when reading for long periods of time.

We are not able to duplicate the format for every title we have available online ( ie purchase both print and online) . However, if you have a list of titles that you would like us to maintain in print format, please forward the list to me and I would be happy to investigate this further.

Kind regards,

Andrea mclell@mcmaster.ca

(Oct 13/09)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison),bannisl

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Aug 25/09) Is it possible to have scrap paper by the computers (upstairs and downstairs)?

Library response: Great idea!  I would love to make the Health Sciences Library "greener" and having staff and patrons deposit any one-sided printing they no longer need (and which doesn't contain private information) would be a small start.  We are investigating how and where we might do this.  Thanks for the suggestion.  BTW, we do have cut up paper at the information and circulation desks. (Aug 26/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Aug 25/09) Why is it that when I have a number of Internet Explorer windows open and I close one of them all of the other windows are closed?

Library response: I am not sure which library you were in when you had this problem, but I am having the systems folks in the Health Sciences Library investigate and come back with an answer. (Aug 26/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Follow-up Comments:

This occurs on the Health Sciences Library computers (2009-08-30)

The Systems’ staff in the Health Sciences Library investigated and was unable to recreate the problem on the computers located in our Learning Commons. If possible, please consider dropping by the library, Monday – Friday between 8:30am – 5:30pm to demonstrate the problem to our IT staff. (2009-09-11)


Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Aug 25/09) It is too cold in the summer.

Library response: I totally agree with you -- I have staff wearing sweaters in their offices!  There have been some major problems with the HVAC (Heating-Ventilation-Air Conditioning) system over the summer as work continues to upgrade the air handling system in the whole building.  Parts of the hospital, including the emergency ward, have been without AC for several weeks of sweltering weather.  Unfortunately, the Health Sciences Library does not control its own climate and the challenges of regulating the temperature in a building this size are enormous. I have this high on my list.  (Aug 26/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Categories: Temperature, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jul 27/09) July 20/2009

Why are the new printers so slow? A 5 min job turned into 20min. I have never had to wait so long for a printer to warm up or rotate the page.

(paper suggestion entered by staff - C. Erskine)

Library response: I consulted with our Systems Specialist on your suggestion/complaint.  Unfortunately, this is an on-going and intermittent problem with certain print jobs.  Sometimes the file being sent is corrupt, sometimes it is an enormous scan posted by a professor, and sometimes the system just seems to bog down.  Our sympathies. (Aug 4/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jul 20/09) - stay open later in the summer
- let science students book rooms in advance
- mac book laptops
- sometimes its too cold

(paper suggestion entered by HS staff - C. Erskine)

Library response:

Extend Summer Hours

We will certainly note your suggestion regarding extending our summer hours.  Traditionally activity in the Library dwindles in the summer but we will monitor this for the future.

 

Health Sciences Library Group Study Room:  Prebooking for science students

We are happy to offer study rooms to any students on campus.  Faculty of Health Sciences programs require many group-based activities and as a result there is heavy use of study rooms by FHS students during the school year.  For that reason we allow FHS students to prebook study rooms.  Please note than prebooking of study rooms is available at other libraries on campus, Mills, Innes, and Thode: http://library.mcmaster.ca/mrbs/.

 

MAC Laptops

We currently do not provide MAC laptops for lending.  MAC systems are particularly strong for multimedia, desktop publishing, fine art, etc.  The additional cost of purchasing MACs  would be justified if it were in support of programs that require specialized software. As it stands, FHS programs require basic productivity software and statistical programs. Basic computer programs like SPSS, Word, Excel, and Powerpoint, function very well in the PC environment.  We feel that it is more cost efficient, both interms of purchase price and staff support, to provide PC laptops. 

Library is Cold:

There are days when we would agree completely!  The old heating and air conditioning system in the hospital does not allow for fine temperature control. It is issue that we continue to address and we appreciate your feedback.

(Jul 20/09)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison),bannisl

Categories: Hours, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jul 6/09) Allow those in the medical radiation science to book out a study room in advance.

(paper suggestion entered by staff - C. Erskine).

Library response:

The request to be given the ability to advance book study rooms in the Health Sciences Library has been raised before by students in and other faculties. Unfortunately, the policy regarding the pre-booking of study room in the Health Sciences Library was created to accommodate the problem based learning formats and the associated assessment exercises used within the Faculty of Health Sciences. At McMaster, Medical Radiation Sciences students are not considered part of the Faculty of Health Sciences. This should not prevent you from being able to use the rooms when they are available. It is only the pre-booking that is restricted to FHS students. However, as more programs move to a problem-based/inquiry-based format, the need to create more group study spaces on campus has been recognized at both McMaster and Mohawk College. Both Mills and Thode libraries offer a number of bookable group study rooms, and there are plans to enhance the group study space in Thode in the future. In addition, the Library at IAHS also provides access to bookable group study rooms for students enrolled in the Medical Radiation Sciences program. Jennifer McKinnell, Head of Public Services, Health Sciences Library

(Jul 7/09)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Follow-up Comments:

What about students in the biochemistry program. To my knowledge, they are part of the faculty of health science? (2009-08-25)

Actually, undergraduate biochemistry students are in the Faculty of Science not the Faculty of Health Sciences.  Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library) Liz Bayley (Director/Head of Systems) (2009-08-26)


Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jun 11/09) Im not sure if this is for all libraries but you guys REALLY should carry change for printers and photocopiers. Money is money and your machines do not accept currency that is not in the form of 5 dollar bills, loonies or toonies. Furthermore, the only cash source near the vicinity is an ATM machine which only deposits 20 $ bills. Usually I am in a rush when I am to use your printing services and since this is a service for students who dont normally carry a lot of money, you should upgrade your machines or carry the appropriate currency. I mentioned to this your staff after a particularly disastrous day (due to running around campus) and the staff curtly replied theres a coffee shop nearby, you know as if that was the obvious solution. NO! I dont want a cup of coffee, I just want to print my assignment and I should be able to do so with pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters and what have yous.

Library response:

I appreciate how frustrating it is to obtain change when you need to use in the print card vending machines located in the McMaster University libraries. Unfortunately, the library does not own those machines. The University contracts out the service to a third party. We have worked with the company responsible for the print cards in an attempt to arrange better service, but at the moment, we are limited by the technical limitations of the vending machines. We have also enquired about having a change machine in the Health Sciences Library but we have been told that this is not an option. Many individuals are not aware that the print cards can also be purchased in the Health Sciences Bookstore (located on the first floor of the hospital near the read elevators). They are equipped with cash registers and debit card machines, making it much easier to purchase or add value to print cards when you do not have exact change.

 

Jennifer McKinnell

Head of Public Services

(Jun 15/09)
Answered by: Jennifer McKinnell (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

Fair enough but the problem was that I did have five dollars in exact change for the debt card but it was not in the form of a five dollar bill. Until the problem is remedied, I think it would be convenient if libraries carried some change on hand. (2009-06-17)

Thank you for taking the time to continue to share your concerns and suggestions. I agree that the entire process of obtaining change seems somewhat frustrating. Unfortunately, the maintenance and support of the print card vending machines is beyond our control. For security and accounting reasons, the Health Sciences Library cannot maintain a float to provide change. I have just confirmed that the print card vending machines will issue new cards regardless of whether the money inserted is a combination of loonies, toonies, or a five dollar bill. Quarters, dimes and nickels do not work. Jennifer McKinnell Head of Public Services Health Sciences Library (2009-06-17)


Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 24/09) Why is there no alcohol-based hand rub/hand sanitizer in the library? I would suggest having some at the library entrance/exit, near all computer stations and by the washroom doors.

Library response: This is an interesting suggestion, but I will need to investigate who would supply and maintain the sanitizer - and the cost implications, since this is not presently in the limited library operating budget. (Apr 24/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 17/09) The wireless network in the Health Sciences Library is slower than other places on campus. I tried 2, 5, 6 & 8 and the signal strength is bad in all of them. Can you do something to improve it?

Library response:

The Library has been extremely busy this week but we have just tested the signal strength on the upper level (2:50 p.m.) and 3 out of 4 had a good response.  We did install Internet ports in the tables, the study rooms and in a few of the carrels in the Quiet Study area on the lower level so you have the option of connecting directly using an internet cable.  We are monitoring and working on this issue - please see the reply I posted to a similar concern on March 12.

(Mar 17/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 17/09) Could there be Microsoft Office 2007 or 2007 readers put on the computer? I hate doing a lot of work at home on Word 2007 then have to reformat everything here before I print it out because the library only has the 2003 version.

Library response:

Ah yes, Microsoft versions!  We install the same version on our public computers as the one University Technology Services mounts in the student technology centres, which is presently Microsoft Office 2003; we are waiting to hear if they are upgrading to 2007 over the summer, in which case we will too.  If not, we will investigate a 2007 reader as you have suggested.  Of course, a change in printers may also result in the need to reformat, so an upgrade on our public workstations may not resolve all of your problems.

(Mar 17/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 12/09) I would like to voice my concern over the speed of wireless internet at the Health Sciences Library. While other libraries on campus do not have this problem, the internet connection here seems to be extremely slow on a daily basis. At times webpages can take over a minute to load, which makes it impossible to conduct any meaningful work online. I am sure many students have experienced similar difficulty with this. It would be great if the bandwidth can be increased to cope with the high volume of library users in this beautiful facility.

Library response: I wanted to make sure I got my facts straight before answering your concern.  The Health Sciences Library has nine wireless access points, with a speed of 54 mbps.  That is lots of capacity, but because of the open nature of the library space, unlike the other libraries the points here have overlapping signals.  The response speed is a result of the number of concurrent users accessing the point.  Unfortunately there is no automatic switching between the points; we are investigating this, but it is a cost issue.  In the meantime, you need to go into the wireless software on your laptop, view all of the available access points and go with the one with the strongest signal.  The good news is that the Computer Services Unit has just ordered a new wireless server to monitor access points for traffic and adjust the signal as needed; testing will occur over the summer, with implementation planned for the fall semester. (Mar 16/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 3/09) Why is the health sci library BLIND to the fact that people use MacBooks? I tried setting up my wireless account and was told I
needed to go to Mills b/c the staff there @ the learning commons could do it for me

Furthermore, I am a HEALTH SCI student - not an humanities/soc sci OR engineering OR business student even though they all
usurp my library and make it IMPOSSIBLE to study here. As a member of the health sci faculty, I believe that when I or any
other health sci student has questions and concerned we dont know someone from OUR library should be able to help us out
and NOT send us packing to other libraries to ask for help b/c health sci staff is too incompetant to help us??!

Cant we find a way to hire more staff? Arent we all going to be health care professionals in here who can donate $$$ to deal
with these issues!?!?

Library response:

Hm...  the Health Sciences Library certainly isn't blind to MacBooks -- many of my best friends use them, and we have certainly helped many people, health sciences and others, set up their Macs to work with our wireless account.  Judging by the time I received this message (9:30 p.m.), maybe you came in after 6 p.m.?  If so, unfortunately our systems staff had gone home for the evening.  We have systems support from 8:30 to 5:30 p.m. from Monday to Friday.  Mills and Thode Library have IT support whenever their Learning Commons are open and can help students from all faculties.  Health Sciences staff are not incompetent, they just don't all have the skills necessary to help you to set up your computer.  Nor do we have the funding to have IT support in the evenings and on weekends.  Finally, the Health Sciences Library is a shared resource, as are all the libraries on campus.  You didn't identify yourself, but feel free to contact me if you want to discuss this in more detail.

(Mar 3/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

This comment is in regards to the inappropriate suggestion made by a health sciences student. Surely, once this individual, gets into a healthcare profession, would lend the resources to selective people or may be own a hospital that no body else could use except people approved by this individual. I can not believe that being a university undergraduate one could make such a comment regarding a libraries staff and calling them incompetent is even worse. I use the health sciences library and it is one of the most efficient libraries on campus with a generous staff. Therefore, i hope further in the future while complains are being put forward no such inapprpriate comments should be directed to any staff of any library. Thank you. (2009-03-07)


Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 16/09) For the love of God is it so hard to keep stuff in supply, i.e. paper in copiers, staples in staplers! Its not like were not shelling out big bucks already @ 10 [cents] a copy![Written suggestion dated January 10, 2009]

Library response: We really do our best to try and keep paper in the photocopiers and printers and staples in the staplers.  We have found the size of the paper trays in the new photocopiers inadequate for heavy use, but we are working with the company to see if there is a solution.  We will ensure that staff is checking supplies regularly particularly in busy times, but please let someone at the desk know if paper or staples have run out.  (Jan 18/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 14/09) I would like make a comment regarding students who continually place reservations on group study rooms in the health sciences library but fail to show up. Given the volume of students who rely on these rooms for group projects or quiet study, they are often unused. I understand at times students may require a break and will go out for lunch/dinner/snack, but in some cases, the rooms are completely empty with the lights turned off and have no personal belongings inside. This suggests the inconsiderate students who reserved these rooms in advance did not even pick up the key! Im especially saddened and frustrated by this since a valuable asset is being wasted in such a beautifully renovated library. I recommend the library to impose a penalty for those who place advance reservations but do not show up. This is what the public libraries have been doing for years!

Library response:

I have just checked on the policy regarding folks who book a group room but don't show up.  In fact, we have a 15 minute grace period after which time the booking is forfeited and then the room is available on a first come first served basis.  We don't have the staff to patrol the rooms to see if they are booked but not being used, but if you see an empty room as you describe please come and inquire at the circulation desk.  I'm not sure if our system would allow us to impose penalties if a room key isn't signed out since at that point we have no patron information but that is an interesting idea.

By the way, the purpose of the rooms is for group work NOT quiet study and we will be discussing policies and procedures to ensure appropriate use of the group work rooms in future. 

(Jan 14/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Dec 9/08) During exam times, study rooms are extremely beneficial. However, I was irritated today to learn that a non-health science student cannot reserve a study room in the Health Science Library in advance, they are only offered on a first come first serve basis to students from other faculties. How is this fair when the other libraries on campus do not restrict the faculties that can reserve study rooms? As far as Im concerned, the tuition a student pays should allow them complete access to any library on campus. Nobody tells the health science students that they cant reserve a study room in Innis, Thode or Mills.

Library response:

In response to a need for more study space during the exam period, the Health Sciences Library has taken its largest group study room, HSC-1B20, off the booking schedule and has left it open for anyone to use.  In fact, the funding for the renovations to our library came from the Faculty of Health Sciences and was focused at meeting the needs for the students in this Faculty. 

Here is the response to a similar request which I posted last Febuary: 

"I do sympathize with your need for more group study rooms, especially as more programs move to an inquiry-based format. Be assure that all of the campus libraries are aware of this issue and that the plans for the renovation of Thode Library include the addition of group study rooms. In the meantime, the Health Sciences Library must address the needs of its primary student users in the Faculty who are required to meet as groups to complete their work. We continue to make the rooms available to students only and allow any group of students to use the rooms, just not to book them in advance. When more study rooms become available in Thode we will certainly reconsider this policy."

(Dec 10/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 23/08) While I understand that theres a trend towards collaborative learning now, and thus the design of the libraries have evolved to become more group-friendly, perhaps theres a way to satisfy both group-workers and individual studiers.

1. Designate the top floor of HSL for quiet study only
2. Group work can be done within the study rooms so to not disturb students around them.

Groups who arent able to book a study room in one of our libraries can benefit from other facilities on campus (e.g. MUMC Cafe, MUSC) that welcome chatter.

Thanks for your consideration.

Library response: Thank you for taking the time to post your ideas.  One of the objectives when we planned the renovations to the Health Sciences Library was to zone various areas for different types of study.  Because the upper level includes the entrance, the service points, computers and large study tables it is considered to be the "Learning Commons" - noisier and group-work oriented.  The lower level is the quieter area, with the exception of the Reading Pavilion which is open to the upper level.  We realize that this does not meet everyone's needs, and balancing the desire for quiet, individual study with the small-group learning philosophy of the Faculty's educational programs is a challenge.  We are studying the use of space in the Library this term in order to get a better idea of what our patrons' needs.  (Nov 24/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 21/08) To Whom it may concern,
I am a regular at the Reading Pavilion. I really like the ambience of not only the Pavilion, but of the entire library. And I like the fact how people actually come here to study and not to catch up on their socializing. The bright lights and the comfortable temperature make the Pavilion an ideal place to study. I would like to request the authorities to make this library 24-hour accessible. Not only will it provide an inviting enviroment for the students to study in late night, but can also serve the doctors, nurses, patients and visitors of the hospital a chance to spend their nights in a useful place, be it doctors reading up on their material, or just visitors who have to spend the night with their loved ones. I believe if the Health Science Library is open 24 hours, not only will it be a welcome addition to McMasters student resources, but also provide a huge boost to the McMaster Hospitals image and facilities.
Although I write this as a student, the benefits of a 24 hour Health Science Library are far and out reaching.
Sincerely,
An avid fan.[Written suggestion dropped in the Suggestion Box, undated]

Library response: Thank you for your compliments on our wonderful Reading Pavilion and renovated library.  We have heard from many students that they find our library conducive to their academic needs and we are certainly working hard to ensure it meets the needs of our users. Our library is in fact accessible 24 hours to clinical staff; however much of the material they require is now available electronically making use of the printed collection much less urgent. The issue is having sufficient staffing, something which the Health Sciences Library cannot presently support.  The Learning Commons in Mills and Thode Libraries are investigating 24 hour access to portions of their space and we are monitoring this closely.   (Nov 23/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Hours, Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 21/08) Please clean the dirty carpets. Hardly looks like a new library anymore![Written suggestion dropped in the Suggestion Box, undated]

Library response:

While the renovated library has many wonderful features, the colour choice for the carpet is unfortunately not one of them.  The carpets are cleaned on a regular schedule and for special events, but it has been impossible to keep up with the stains.  We ask that our patrons only bring drinks in covered, reusable containers but there is obviously a lot of spillage. The challenge is to work with our patrons to prevent this from happening, since we have neither the funds nor the resources to clean such a large area more frequently.  

(Nov 23/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 21/08) E-books ... so many drawbacks:
1)hard on the eyes 2)only access 1 week 3) only access one monitor, cant read at home ... weekends etc. 4)not user friendly
E-books are hard on older persons eyes (after 40) and are not user friendly. Id like to access the hard cover via ILL. [Two separate written suggestions dropped in the Suggestion Box, undated]

Library response: I agree that reading complete books on a computer screen is hard on anybody's eyes.  The reason we have moved to e-books is that so many of our users are no longer located on campus, and this allows them to be accessed from anywhere at any time.  However, there is definitely a need for printed books so we will investigate the possibility of still acquiring hardcopy of titles which we have electronically. (Nov 23/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 21/08) Need plastic bottle recycling options on both floors. People are more likely to recycle if they have an accessible and convenient way of doing it. [Written suggestion dropped in the Suggestion Box, undated]

Library response:

How timely - the Library is just starting to investigate ways to be more "green."  I will certainly investigate this idea, but of course the real issue is not to buy drinks in those plastic bottles in the first place.  Instead, if possible use refillable containers and give the environment a break!

(Nov 23/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 21/08) Can you please post a sign in the History of Medicine Room, saying that it is a quiet study area? [Written suggestion dropped in the Suggestion Box, undated]

Library response:

While people working in the History of Health and Medicine Room tend to be quiet, it is in fact not a designated quiet study area.  That room and the adjacent Archives and Rare Book Room all contain working collections, so talking is necessary to assist users and to set up displays.  Library staff is conscious of the need to keep noise contained in all parts of the Library.

(Nov 23/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 11/08) Why do you not subscribe to the following journal? There are many faculty, students and researchers at McMaster who would benefit from this journal:
Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this title to our attention.  Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine has not been recommended for purchase in the past and we appreciate you taking the time to submit a request.  When considering a subscription for purchase we look at a number of aspects, including our budget, how many times the title has been request through Interlibrary Loan, and how often it is selected to view full text in our databases. At this time we have significant budget restraints.  Additionally, this title has not been requested often through Interlibrary Loan or through the Get It links in Embase. That being said, Respiratory Medicine is a strong area of interest at McMaster, and I have added the title to our recommendation list.  The recommendation file is reviewed periodically when budget conditions are favorable. Thanks once again for your recommendation.  If you wish to contact me via email, I can be reached at mclell@mcmaster.ca - Andrea McLellan  (Acting Head of Collections and Technical Services).

(Nov 24/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison),Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

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(Sep 20/08) Im wondering if you can enable tabbed browsing in the current internet browser?

Library response: I assume what you are meaning is having various Web pages appear as tabs at the top of the screen?  I will investigate further, but you already have the same functionality  - when you open a new Web page, a new tab appears at the bottom of the screen. (Sep 22/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

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(Jul 16/08) The Biology and Pharmacology program is a joint program with both the Faculty of Health Science as well as the Faculty of Science. So would the biopharmers be allowed to pre-book a room in the health sci library?

Library response:

You are correct that this is a joint program.  What triggers the ability to pre-book is a sticker on the student card indicating that you are in the Faculty of Health Sciences.  We are investigating this with the registrar's office, and I will update this response when we get further information. If you are presently in the BioPharm program, you can check yourself to see if you have a sticker on your card and post a comment to let us know!  Thanks.

UPDATE:

The library has been in contact with the Registrar’s office and that this year the Biopharm students will not be receiving Faculty of Health Sciences (FHS) stickers for their student cards. This does not mean that you will be prevented from pre-booking our study rooms. All FHS students are entitled to pre-book study rooms. Our study room booking policy is available at: http://hsl.mcmaster.ca/about/equipstudy.htm

 

If you decide you want to book a study room you simply need to identify yourself as a student enrolled in the Biology and Pharmacology program at out circulation desk. We are working with your program to get a list of student names that we can keep on file. We are also working with the Registrar’s office to try and ensure that in the future, Biopharm students will receive FHS stickers for their student cards. [Posted by Jennifer McKinnell, Acting Head of Public Services]

 

(Jul 16/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

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(Jun 19/08) Hooks in bathroom stalls. I usually study alone and dont like to leave my computer and belongings unattended, so going to the bathroom while holding my purse, books, and laptop is extremely inconvenient. [Handwritten suggestion dropped into the Suggestion Box in the Health Sciences Library.]

Library response: Thank you for bringing this issue to our attention.  We didn't realize that there were no hooks in the public washroom stalls.  They will be added asap, since their lack is not only inconvenient but also irresponsible on our part. Our apologies. (Jun 19/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

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(May 29/08) Hello:

With the new school year approaching, it would be quite helpful if there was a Health Sciences Library sign by the main entrance to the library, and a clock near the Circulation Desk. The renovated library was completed by the end of February 2007, so have these items been forgotten?
Thank-you.

Library response:

Oh no, these haven't been forgotten, just delayed.  You may have noticed that the front entrance has recently been re-renovated, with more glass and a railing to stop people from walking into the glass.  We wanted to wait until this work was complete before the "Health Sciences Library" sign was added. We have chosen a design for the sign, and this should be added this summer.  The idea for a clock by the Circulation Desk is being considered although it's tricky to find a location.  There is a clock over the print stations on the upper level which is large and pretty visible.

UPDATE: A sign saying "Health Sciences Library" has just been added above the entrance door to the library.  (Posted by Liz Bayley (Director), August 29, 2008)

(Jun 6/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(May 8/08) Itd be great if you could provide access to Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (cJASN). As you probably know Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN) is the most important Nephrology specialty journal with impact factor of about 7. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology about two years ago was divided into two journals: the traditional one (JASN) and clinical (cJASN). Since this journal has such a great importance to all specialists in kidney research, I feel McMaster health sciences library should help research community getting access to it.

Library response:

Thanks for indicating that this particular journal title is important to you.

I did some checking and I find that the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology does, in fact, appear in our library catalogue because there is a print copy of it in the library at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton (Charlton Street location). You could go there to consult it, if you wish, or we can get copies of articles for you from that library if you request them through RACER, our online Interlibrary Loan system.

We do have an online subscription to the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology and there is a link on that site to the Clinical Journal, so that you are able to see the table of contents and abstracts of papers that way. Since we do not currently subscribe to the Clinical Journal, however, you cannot access the full text of articles in the Clinical Journal online.

I will pass your suggestion along to our Acting Head of Collections and Technical Services who will add this title to a list of those we consider for purchase when we have money to add titles.

In future, if you simply wish to recommend a title for purchase, you can always do so by using the book (http://library.lib.mcmaster.ca/php/bkrecomm.php) and journal (http://library.mcmaster.ca/php/jnlrecomm.php) recommendation forms found on our web site.

Thanks, again, for calling this title to our attention!

UPDATE: This title will be purchased by the Health Sciences Library. It will be available in electronic format. (May 22/08)

(May 8/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library),Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison)

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(Apr 30/08) Three handwritten suggestions dropped into the Suggestion Box in the Health Sciences Library:

I have a problem with printing process. Why do we have to travel to Mills Library to print colour documents? That ... process needs/should be changed in the future. Thanks! 11 April 2008

Health Sciences Library must get a colour printer !!! This issue needs to be addressed immediately! I do not want to have to go ALL the way over to Mills to print in colour : inconvenience! Our schedule is to busy to have to run around everywhere! 14 April 2008

You guys need a fax machine, a scanner and a colour printer. Mills is too far! [undated]

Library response:

New equipment -- such as colour printers, fax machines and scanners -- is expensive and for that reason, we need to consider such proposals carefully. 

We have examined the idea of a colour printer on several occasions in the past and determined that we cannot afford to support the expense in the Health Sciences Library.  We have consulted with the Mills Library and looked at an experiment run by the Innis Library with colour printing. Our conclusion is that the anticipated volume of copying would not bring in adequate revenue to make the purchase of a colour printer possible. The Mills Library is not far enough away to allow us to consider it a hardship to have to pick up copies there if a colour print is required.

The issue with a scanner is that we simply do not have the staff to provide the support a scanner requires. The best evidence we can consult indicates that about one third of the users of a scanner can get the required results on their own; another third requires assistance, and the final third really requires service or complete intervention in order to be successful.  We do not have the staff even during the day to provide that level of support, and we can provide no technical support at all in the evening and on the weekends. 

A fax machine is costly to purchase (or lease) and install and requires ongoing payment of telephone line charges.  We could not bring in enough money from the use of such a service here in the Health Sciences Library to make a fax service self-supporting. 

All of these services are available elsewhere on campus. In the face of difficulty providing adequate information resources required by the programmes we support in the Faculty of Health Sciences, it would be irresponsible to divert scarce funds to conveniences which are available reasonably close by.

I regret that we are not currently able to respond positively to these suggestions, but will continue to monitor the situation with respect to requests for all of these tools closely.

(Apr 30/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 19/08) Why is there no software on the computers to unzip zipped files? It makes it very difficult to view files that are posted to medportal (the online educational system used by medical students).

Library response:

Thanks for letting us know about this issue. I checked with the MedPortal folks about the number and nature of zipped files, and this was their reply: "There are only 5 or 6 zipped files (from dozens and dozens) in the Medportal downloads area. So I wouldn't say its common for files delivered through Medportal to be zipped, but sometimes it's necessary for the delivery of large files or for things like "standalone" eLearning modules that have several folders associated with them." The reason we don't have this software is not to stop the download of learning modules, but rather the issue of allowing the download of large music and video files on our public computers - some of these can take a very long time to download and our present set-up makes the clean up of files difficult.  The Learning Commons at Mills has Microsoft Unzip software on their computers, so you could use that facility.  We certainly have this on our wish list for future enhancements to our public computing.

(Apr 22/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

I disagree with the number provided by Medportal. All Pro Comp files are distributed in zipped format (attached to the body of the message - so they do not show up in the downloads section) and there are at least 1-2 files provided each week. (2008-04-29)

Our apologies. You are right, the PC material is not posted into the file download section and further investigation resulted in the following message: We currently have over 5700 forum posts (and counting) and I cant be sure about how many zipped files might be attached to these posts. Since the student mentioned there are 1 or 2 zipped files posted to the ProComp forums weekly, I took a look and that seems to be an accurate statement. I am following up with the Professional Competencies folks. Liz Bayley, Director, Health Sciences Library. (2008-04-30)


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(Apr 12/08) I think that you should get the same earplugs as mills because they are sronger and they work better to blog the noice. thank you.

Library response: Thanks for your suggestion; we will look into the difference between what we use and what Mills uses before our current supply runs out. We have just purchased a large supply, though, and will have to use these up before we can switch to another brand. (Apr 14/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Other, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 3/08) PLEASEpleasepleaseplease add/shift more computers to a quiet area. The upstairs computer area is permitted to have conversations and cell phones, and the downstairs computers are located right near the couches where group meetings etc are always held. I can not afford a computer and need to use them at school to study. Recently I have been trying to complete several online examinations and really struggling to concentrate because of noise levels from nearby students. There needs to be a quiet computers area for those students who need to work on their assignments online and in peace. I have and do use earplugs but they arent perfect, and the doctor recommended I quit using them due to recurrent ear infections. So please, shift some computers to the quiet area for serious students to use. Thanks

Library response:

The period just before final examinations is a very noisy and stressful period in campus libraries every year. I can sympathize with the difficulty you are having in finding a quiet space to access our desktop computers.  All of our desktops are located in areas intended for collaborative work. With our experience of the recent renovation here in the HSL and knowledge of the planning and construction that would have to be done to move any of the desktop computers anywhere else, I would venture to suggest that the chances of a successful solution to your current difficulty along the lines you would like are not high.

The noise we are currently experiencing is only temporary, and it rises at this time of year, annually, without our being able to do much about it. It will also abate, and you will be able to find a quiet spot to use a computer when this period of stress is over. Campus libraries are all overburdened with patrons at this time of year and there is little we can do to keep the noise levels down without increasing the stress level of both patrons and staff. 

In the meantime, I suggest that instead of looking for a dekstop computer, you borrow a laptop from our Circulation Desk.  You will then be able to take it to a quiet place in the library where you can do your online work. There are both Quiet and Silent Study areas on the lower floor of the library. Our laptops are heavily used as well, and I suggest that the best time to succeed in getting one is in the morning, before others arrive and there is competition for them. 

Another possibility is that you try using computers in the Reserve Reading Room; there is less traffic and less noise in that area of the library.  

(Apr 3/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Computers/WiFi/Printers, Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 1/08) My suggestion or comment is on the librarys fine on laptops. It is currently $20 if you are pass the 3hr limit. I understand the need others have for these services however I find $20 a bit steep. Obviously, students do not intend to bring computers back late if they do. Perhaps a lowering of the fine would be more reasonable for students who obviously cant even afford a computer of their own.

Library response:

Thanks for commenting on the way you perceive our fines for overdue laptops; we need to know that people find the fines steep. Unfortunately, however, there is little chance of these fines being reduced at all in the near future.

We have very limited numbers of laptops to lend in all campus libraries and large demand for them.  As you might imagine, when fines are set up for untimely return, it is because the material is not being returned on time (if it was, we would not need to charge fines).  We must have some method of impressing on borrowers the importance of using this loaned equipment in a timely fashion and a penalty for non-compliance seems to work better than anything else. If we charged only $5.00 per hour (or part) overdue, or only $10.00, people would think: "Oh, I can afford to pay that for another 30 minutes' use" and be even tardier than they are now. The threat of a $20.00 fine per hour for tardy return has seemed to keep most of those who might be tempted to forget the time on the "straight-and-narrow" path.

Reduction of the rate of this fine would send to borrowers the message that it doesn't cost much to delay return of the borrowed laptop. It would further inconvenience those waiting to get a laptop from our lending programmes and create a disservice to everyone. There has been discussion among staff of raising the fine which we have resisted to this point.  I don't believe that your suggestion to reduce the fine for overdue laptops is going to be one we can adopt.

(Apr 2/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 27/08) CAN you please have designated areas for cell phone use, and enforce the policy!? IE not where people are trying to study IE at the computers. It is incredibly distractly when people are constanting talking on their phones when you are trying to study. Thank YOU!

Library response:

The Health Sciences Library does not have a policy that excludes cell phone use, except in the Silent and Quiet Study Areas on the lower floor. Signs indicating that cell phone use and conversations are prohibited in these areas have recently been put up. 

We ask that those who use cell phones in other areas of the library do so in a manner that respects the needs of others and we suggest that this means taking (or making) the call in our lobby, or at least, in an area where few others will be disturbed. 

The upper floor of the Health Sciences Library is meant to be an area where collaboration and conversation is permitted so that learning can happen through the exchange of ideas. Yes, there are those who push the limits and sometimes the noise is a bit much, but we have a number of places on the lower floor where silent study is possible, and other places where quiet study and quiet conversations are expected.

As for enforcement, we can ask -- and so can you -- that people who are pushing the limits recognize the need to maintain an environment conducive to study and learning. Librarians and library staff are not police, however; that is not what we are here for. We will lend you our support and ask that those whose behaviour infringes stop behaving in an offensive manner if you let us know about it, but we don't make "behaviour patrols" and the only power to change behaviour we have is that of moral suasion.

In an effort to make expectations around behaviour in the Health Sciences Library a bit more clear, we will soon be publicizing a document: Regulations Governing Behaviour in the Health Sciences Library that outlines these expectations.  Watch for it on our web site; it should be in place for the fall term. We hope that when expectations around behaviour in the Health Sciences Library become more clear and better known, some of the problems we now encounter will resolve themselves.

   

(Mar 31/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

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(Feb 26/08) how does the fireplace in the history of medicine room in the basement of the health sci libary get turned on/off?

Library response: The fireplace in the History of Medicine Room in the Health Sciences Library is turned on and off by library staff. Because of the hazards involved in dealing with gas and a pilot light, we ask everyone else to refrain from trying to turn it on. If you want the fireplace on (or off) while studying in the History of Medicine Room, please knock on the door of the Archivist/History of Medicine Librarian and ask for assistance. If there is no response in that office, please contact the Circulation Desk for assistance. Please do not tamper with the controls on your own. (Feb 27/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

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(Feb 22/08) Food should not be permitted in Library.

Library response: For many years we banned eating in the all of the libraries on campus.  Did this work?  No - patrons simply snuck the food in, then hid the remaining garbage throughout the library.  Library staff could not enforce the rule, so along with most university libraries in North America we stopped trying.  We are in the process of reviewing our regulations for behaviour in the library including respect for others and responsible disposal of garbage. Once these are finalized they will be posted.  Thank you for your concern and in the meantime if you have more specific suggestions please let us know. (Feb 22/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Follow-up Comments:

I dont think eating food in the library should necessarily be banned. If Ive been studying for hours and I want a snack (which research shows is very important when one is studying) it seems silly for me to have pack up all my stuff and leave just to eat (especially during peak hours when someone will likely take my spot while Im gone and Ill then have to spend another 30 minutes searching for another one). I think the best thing you can do is encourage people to use their own discretion when bringing food into the building (i.e. to throw out their garbage, avoid making lots of noise with wrappers, etc.) (2008-03-08)


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(Feb 10/08) I love the renovated Health Sciences library! Especially the History of Medicine Room. Im a humanities student, and clearly have nothing to do in this library, but it is far nicer and far more aesthetically pleasing than Mills. Further, unlike Mills Library, it is actually Quiet!! I gladly go out of my way to study at Health Sciences library. It is ironic that this library has the decor appropriate for the Arts library, and that the Arts library has the sterile environment suited for the science library.

Library response: Thanks for your comments! We are very happy with the aesthetics of our renovated space and pleased that you (and many, many others) choose to study here.One of the really nice things about the renovation is that it has provided us with spaces for group consultation and spaces for individual, quiet study. You can't always please everybody, but this design satisfies a great many of our patrons! (Feb 11/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

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(Feb 6/08) I want a first-floor entrance to the Health Sciences library.

Library response: An entrance to the Health Sciences Library on the first floor of the building is not a possibility both for security reasons and for practical reasons. Entrances are also exits and they have to be staffed so as to make it possible for library users to take material out of the library when they leave. We can afford to staff only one entrance/exit to the Health Sciences Library, and that is on the upper floor of the library, where it has been since the library opened about 40 years ago. Switching the main entrance to the lower floor would make little sense to most of the people in the Health Sciences Centre (who are our primary user group) since the second floor is the main floor in this building and they would then have to descend one floor further to enter the library. (Feb 6/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Customer Service, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 6/08) I would like all McMaster University students to be able to book the study rooms at the Health Sciences library.

Library response: Thank you for your suggestion, which has been made several times before. The educational programs in the Faculty of Health Sciences require the students to meet as groups to complete their work. Therefore, as our primary users, they get precedence for booking study rooms. As I noted in my response to a previous suggestion, as more programs move to a problem-based/inquiry-based format, the need to create more group study rooms is recognized. More group study rooms are planned for the Thode Library renovation and all of those rooms will be open and bookable by the entire campus community using the online room booking service. When the other libraries set up a laptop lending program, we extended the Health Sciences Library lending to all McMaster students. In the same way, once more study rooms are available in Thode, we will certainly re-examine our policies. (Feb 6/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

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(Jan 28/08) My name is Sadia Iqbal and I am a member of the Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences Society here at McMaster. I am writing this email to address the issue of room booking in the Health Sciences Library. Currently, the only students allowed to pre-book rooms in the library are Health Sciences students, but this does not include members of the Biochemistry Department. Our department prides itself in being a joint program between the Faculty of Science and the Faculty of Health Sciences so we therefore feel that Biochemistry students should also have the privilege of pre-booking rooms. The teaching style in the Health Sciences program shares many similarities with our department, most notably the concept of problem based learning and inquiry classes. This type of learning style requires a substantial amount of group work and thus our students could definitely take advantage of the rooms available in the library, if given the privilege. Although we are able to book rooms if they are available, the rooms are in very high demand and finding a room at the time needed is difficult. The society understands that it is not feasible to give everyone the privilege of pre-booking rooms, however we feel that our argument is genuine and that it should at least be considered. Thank you very much for your time, Sadia Iqbal Co-President Biochemisty and Biomedical Sciences Society McMaster University

Library response: The request to be given the ability to advance book study rooms in the Health Sciences Library has been raised before by students and faculty of the Biochemistry Department, but a reminder of the issues and solutions is important. At McMaster, undergraduate Biochemistry students are considered part of the Faculty of Science, not the Faculty of Health Sciences. However, as more programs move to a problem-based/inquiry-based format, the need to create more group study rooms is recognized. You will be glad to know that adding enclosed group study rooms is a key objective of the Thode Library renovation. According to Vivian Lewis, Associate University Librarian, Teaching, Learning and Research, the last set of revisions show 12 rooms - although the final number and location is yet to be determined. All rooms will be open and bookable by the entire campus community using our online room booking service. When the other libraries set up a laptop lending program, we extended the Health Sciences Library lending to all McMaster students. In the same way, once more study rooms are available in Thode, we will certainly re-examine our policies. (Jan 28/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Study Space, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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