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Suggestion

(Oct 24/17) Hi Mac Libraries - Is it possible for us to get a subscription to The Financial times? Given
the current state of our global economy, I think it would be beneficial for our students and
faculty to have access to this credible resource. Thanks!

Library response:

The library has online coverage from several providers with a one-month embargo, and our Innis library receives the print newspaper - http://discovery.mcmaster.ca/iii/encore/record/C__Rb3077411?lang=eng.  Unfortunately, pricing for digital access for libraries is very different than that provided for individuals - the papers want to stay in business! - and to date, our combined print/embargoed access is the best we can do.  Agreed that this is a good source!

(Oct 26/17)
Answered by: Janice Adlington (Collections & Information Resources Librarian)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Oct 12/17) Hello,

I am very confused with the new catalogue on library computer. It only seems to show e-books and
the regular library catalogue is blocked for some reason. Normally Id just go on my phone to the
library catalogue, but the wifi coverage in the upper floors of Mills that even this is
frustrating.

Thank you

Library response:

I'm sorry to hear that you're finding the new catalogue confusing. 

There are three different kinds of searches that you can do:

  1. The Quick Search tab simultaneously searches the library catalogue and the contents of several subscription and open access databases. The search results on this tab do include the Library's catalogue of both print and online resources, but the additional databases being searched mean that you will often see many more online resources.
  2. The Catalogue tab provides the same interface, but searches only McMaster’s library catalogue. This tab will show you both print and online resources, but only those that we have added to the McMaster libraries' catalogue.
  3. The Classic Catalogue link on the Library homepage takes you to a different interface. This site supports browsing of the library catalogue by author, title, subject, and others, as well as a keyword search. The search results here will include both print and online resources from the Library's catalogue, presented in a more traditional interface.

 

 

You can move from Quick Search to Catalogue by clicking the appropriate tab on the Library's homepage or in the search results screen. The Classic Catalogue is separate from the other two. Follow the link on the Library's homepage to search there.

I hope that helps to make the catalogue a little less confusing! There is much more information about the new catalogue and some of its extra features in the FAQ document linked from the Library homepage, or at https://library.mcmaster.ca/content/quick-search-faq. 

(Oct 12/17)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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(Aug 21/17) Ive been testing out the new catalogue pretty extensively this week and I have to say it falls
short in a lot of ways. Unless Im totally missing it, the place of publication has been
removed from the catalogue listings. And the search by text function is gone. Are these
features that will be added back? I know any new system is going to have growing pains, but
this is really frustrating.

Library response:

Thanks for testing out the new catalogue and sharing your comments. 

The place of publication information is on our list to add for the new discovery interface; it's not included in the "out of the box" display settings, but we agree it's useful information. It does appear in the Classic Catalogue record display.

When you say "search by text", I'm guessing that you want to browse the catalogue. As with our previous catalogue, the main search box on the Library's website is all keyword searching. You can look for words together as a phrase in that interface by putting the phrase in quotes, but it won't present you with a browse result.

The Classic Catalogue interface does support browsing. With the exception of Keyword, all of the Classic Catalogue indexes are phrase searches and will look for records with your search terms in the order that you entered them. Choose the index that you want to search--author, title, journal title, subject, etc.--from the dropdown to get started.

I hope that helps. If you have additional questions, don't hesitate to get in touch: http://library.mcmaster.ca/justask

Wade Wyckoff
Associate University Librarian, Collections

(Aug 22/17)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Jul 15/14) Hi, may I recommend that the library purchase a copy of McMaster alumnus Max Haivens important new book: Cultures of Financialization (Palgrave Macmillian 2014). His recent Crises of Imagination, Crises of Power (Zed Books, 2014) is also worth acquiring.

http://www.palgrave.com/page/detail/cultures-of-financialization-max-haiven/?k=9781137355966

Thanks!
Simon Orpana

Library response:

Thanks for alerting us to these publications..  The library has purchased "Crises of Imagination' as an e-book, and will buy "Cultures of Financialization: Fictitious Capital..." when Palgrave releases it later in August.  Looks interesting!

 

 

 

(Aug 14/14)
Answered by: Janice Adlington (Collections & Information Resources Librarian)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Feb 19/14) Please add the journal of Medical Internet Research to our access. High relevance and many articles support my research interest.
Many thanks, MSc candidate(eHealth)

Library response:

The use and accessibility of this title has been reviewed and the journal title will be added to the HSL collection.

(Feb 25/14)
Answered by: mclell

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Jan 24/14) Is there anyway that McMaster students can receive access to a few additional scientific journals? Some of the very common medical journals such as Nature Reviews, Nature Protocols, and even the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) are not available to mac students. As a graduate student, especially those of us in medical research, it is extremely frustrating to be unable to access these articles. Moreover, the few times I have made requests through RACER, the quality of the print was horrible (it looked like it had been faxed over) and impossible to read. Inadvertently, many of us resort to asking our friends at other institutes such as University of Toronto, to send us copies of these articles. As a research intensive university, is there anyway to fix this? Or at the very least, offer better alternatives (i.e. providing a PDF vs a starchy black and white copy).

Library response:

Thank you for submitting this concern.  The good news is that McMaster currently subscribes to Nature Protocols and a number of Nature Review titles. Please feel free to contact me directly if you have a Nature Review title in mind that we do not subscribe to and I will gladly evaluate this for our collection.  I have heard from the University Library that they plan to begin a subscription to JOVE General.  I expect this will become available in the near future. You mentioned concerns about the quality of RACER requests.  This is a concern for us.  If you currently experience poor quality documents I encourage you to contact the Health Sciences Library directly so that we may resolve the issue. Supporting your educational and research endeavours is a priority at the Health Sciences Library.  Please do not hesitate to contact me directly if you have further resource concerns.

Andrea McLellan

Head of Collections and Technical Services, X24169

(Jan 28/14)
Answered by: mclell

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Oct 22/13) Hi! I am a grad student who only comes to campus a couple times a week. I depend on reliable remote access to databases and
the catalogue. I am constantly frustrated with the slow loading pages! Though most of the time I can get the catalogue to work
by refreshing things, I do not find the same success with the ATLA database. I am unable to download 9/10 PDF files when
accessing the database from home. I hit refresh MULTIPLE times, sometimes trying for more than 30 mins on one article. The
PDF will load one or two pages but the progress bar stalls just before the end. This means not only can I not download the PDF,
but I also cant read it. Strangely, this does not happen when I have my computer on campus. I am convinced that if the
catalogue and databases worked as they are supposed to (and as they DO work at other universities Ive attended) the
resource-finding stage of my research would take me half as long. In graduate studies, efficiency can make or break you!
Please work to fix the problem and offer me some suggestions in the meantime. Thanks

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to report this. I have a follow-up question so am hoping you will reply to me via the email that this response will generate, namely, have you had this problem specifically within the last few days? I ask because we implemented a fix last week that we thought had resolved these issues, and yours is the first report of issues after the application of that remedy. Hence currency is paramount here.

(Oct 22/13)
Answered by: Dale Askey (Associate University Librarian, Library Learning Technologies)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Sep 8/12) I want to recommend a referencing software, known as mendley.It is far more easier and user-friendly compared to refworks. Moreover refworks has lot of issues for off-campus users. Mendley has lots of updated features like free sharing of references which makes it more helpful for a cross country research. I request you to kindly have a look into this issue.

http://www.mendeley.com/compare-mendeley/

Library response:

Thanks for your suggestion to consider replacing RefWorks with Mendeley.  We are certainly aware of this product.  However, we have licensed RefWorks through OCUL (Ontario Council of University Libraries) who agree on joint products and get good prices as a result.  We simply can't afford to license a separate product on our own.  Sorry!  In the meantime, you can use the free version of Mendeley which comes with lots of neat features including mobile access, although you are limited to 50 MB of storage space.

(Oct 16/12)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Mar 7/12) Hello staff! thanks for maintaining a great library system! I was wondering if you could tell me if you have any book suggestion forms (online or in person?)? If you do, can you tell me how that works? if not, I was wondering if you have considered implementing one? Thanks.

Library response:

Thanks for the compliment, we're glad that you like the libraries!

We do have book recommendation form on our website that you can use. Here's the link: http://library.mcmaster.ca/php/bkrecomm.php

(Mar 8/12)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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(Jan 22/12) It would be very helpful if the library had this available:
Perspectives on Complementary and Alternative Medicine
ISBN 9780203023297

Thank you.

Library response:

Thank you for sending in this book recommendation.  I am happy to purchase material on this topic, however I notice that this book was published in 2006 and is a bit old.  I will investigate purchasing recent books on Complementary and Alternative Medicine, but if you feel that this book in particular should be added to the collection, please contact me directly and I can do that.

Regards,

Andrea McLellan, Head of Collections, Health Sciences Library.

(Jan 23/12)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Dec 13/11) RECOMMENDED ACQUISITION: JOURNAL OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY (BRILL).
APPLICATIONS: philosophy; sociology; education; bioethics; humanities

Library response:

McMaster has online access to current issues of this journal via Swetswise

http://library.mcmaster.ca/catalogue/Record/1848072

Scholars Portal is working to correct an issue with the ejournals A-Z which prevents some titles from displaying in the list.  We believe this problem started on Sunday, and we hope they will have it resolved very quickly.  Right now, the 'Journal of Moral Philosophy' is only visible from the catalogue.

 

(Dec 13/11)
Answered by: Janice Adlington (Collections & Information Resources Librarian)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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(Dec 10/11) SCOPUS is not availabe from 1 month ago. This database belongs to Elsevier ScienceDirect. When I try to connect it via Libaccess, it says:
(You cannot connect to Scopus because you are outside your institutes access range.
Please contact your library or administrator and ask for a free Username and Password. You will then be able to access Scopus anytime, anywhere.)
It is worthy to note that this problem occers only for Scopus database and just from 1 month ago. Does the access to Scopus is expired?
Are you planning to make it available again? I need to access it frequently.

Library response:

McMaster University does not maintain a subscription to Scopus; however, this database was accessible for approximately one month during October on a trial basis only.

Kind regards,

Andrea

(Dec 12/11)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Oct 24/11) Please give MORRIS back to me. And please -- as a matter of technical policy --
dont turn off any legacy way of doing catalog searches until you are sure that every
last student who ever used an old way is long gone from the university.

Your new catalogue implementation is pretty horrible at this point, not news to you
Im sure.

But critical now at mid-semester is that Export to RefWorks from the book catalogue
does not work (from e-journal DBMSs it is fine). After logging into RefWorks, you
wait and wait then finally import failed is always the message.

Please prioritize this fix!

Thank you

Library response:

Thanks for the feedback. You hit the nail on the head, and all I can say is we're aware of the issues and working through them one at a time. A few details, at least, might help answer some things.

It's not possible, alas, to leave legacy systems running in parallel to new systems. The reasons for that are myriad, but there's no way around it, not least in a contractual sense. In this particular case, we did not manage the transition as well as we could have for myriad reasons, one of which was that I assumed my position in the middle of the migration from one system to the other, so the interface work got underway far too late due to that.

The good news I can share is that the RefWorks issue, previously identified, has been moved up the queue for remediation, as have the other functions next to it on records (emailing and 'cite this'). The other good news is that our catalogue will get better, step by step. Thanks for your patience, and for pointing out this particular issue.

(Oct 24/11)
Answered by: Dale Askey (Associate University Librarian, Library Learning Technologies)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(Sep 28/11) Computer #30366 in Mills second floor- PDF reader not working!

Library response: Thanks for letting us know! We'll check on this.
(Sep 29/11)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Follow-up Comments:

this should be working now. (2011-09-29)


Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(Sep 23/11) Time Magazine would be a great addition to our already outstanding collection of extracurricular reading material.

Library response:

We would love to have Time magazine at Innis but it is considered a general news magazine and not specific to Business.  However, the good news is that the August 8th 2011 edition is available in paper format at Mills Library:  http://library.mcmaster.ca/catalogue/Record/789926

Thank you for your comments and compliments about our collection.

(Sep 23/11)
Answered by: Ann Pearce (Supervisor, Information Services, Innis Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Innis  |  Permalink
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(Sep 12/11) The new catalogue, introduced last week, is worst than the one introduced in May, which
was itself almost unusable. The library system no longer has a reliable catalogue
system. Functionally, the library is now useless.

Library response:

Yes, we've gone through a bit of a rough patch with our catalogues, and the timing could not have been less fortuitous, we know. As the saying goes, when it rains, it pours, and we've even experienced some unexpected outages on external servers that have taken down the catalogue. Thankfully, that is now behind us, and we are making incremental improvements to the catalogue. Please bear with us through this phase; ultimately, the new catalogue will be a very powerful and full-featured tool.

I am curious, however: what you are trying to do? I wonder if we can't address some specific concern. 

(Sep 22/11)
Answered by: Dale Askey (Associate University Librarian, Library Learning Technologies)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(Aug 12/11) the new library catalog search is horrible! The old one was actually quite nice. I cant find a single useful book using the new catalog search! Please improve this tool!

Library response:

Thanks for taking the time to share your concerns about the library catalogue search.

The public catalogue interfaces that we previously had in place were directly tied to the staff-side library management software. MORRIS, in fact, was an integral part of that older system. The Endeca public interface that we had been running for the past three years or so was also customized to work specifically with that product.

The library management system that we previously used is no longer being developed by the vendor, requiring a move to a different platform with different system architectures. As MORRIS was part of the old system, retaining it was not an option--though we did move any lists that users had created and saved in MORRIS from that interface to the current catalogue as part of the migration. Checkouts and other user account information were also retained and moved forward. Similarly, Endeca could not be moved forward without significant amounts of redevelopment.

I do want to reassure you that searching will get better. The catalogue search currently available is tied directly to the staff-side management software. We do not see this as a long-term solution to providing library users with access to resources. A team is already working on a replacement interface that will be a vast improvement over the "bundled" catalogue. The new public interface software will be based on VuFind. It is open, flexible, and will let us design with our users' needs in mind. VuFind has already been implemented in a number of academic libraries, including Yale, Georgia Tech, the University of Michigan, and York. We expect to have the new interface in place before the start of the new term.

We appreciate your patience as we work through this interim period.  (Aug 14/11)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(Jul 28/11) I would suggest reverting back to the old search engine on the library website. The new search engine is not very good. For example, when Inorganic Chemistry is typed into the search window with title selected, it is the 14th entry on the list, behind entries such as Introduction to Coordination Chemistry and Physical Inorganic Chemistry: Principles, Methods, and Reactions. This is not a new phenomonon as I have experience this problem with many searches over the past couple of months.

Library response:

Thanks for taking the time to share your concerns about the library catalogue search.

The public catalogue interfaces that we previously had in place were directly tied to the staff-side library management software. MORRIS, in fact, was an integral part of that older system. The Endeca public interface that we had been running for the past three years or so was also customized to work specifically with that product.

The library management system that we previously used is no longer being developed by the vendor, requiring a move to a different platform with different system architectures. As MORRIS was part of the old system, retaining it was not an option--though we did move any lists that users had created and saved in MORRIS from that interface to the current catalogue as part of the migration. Checkouts and other user account information were also retained and moved forward. Similarly, Endeca could not be moved forward without significant amounts of redevelopment.

I do want to reassure you that searching will get better. The catalogue search currently available is tied directly to the staff-side management software. We do not see this as a long-term solution to providing library users with access to resources. A team is already working on a replacement interface that will be a vast improvement over the "bundled" catalogue. The new public interface software will be based on VuFind. It is open, flexible, and will let us design with our users' needs in mind. VuFind has already been implemented in a number of academic libraries, including Yale, Georgia Tech, the University of Michigan, and York. We expect to have the new interface in place before the start of the new term.

We appreciate your patience as we work through this interim period. 

(Jul 28/11)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(May 25/11) It seems as though there have been recent upgrades to the HSL website that has removed the quick search feature from the home page. I found this very convenient to find particular material that I was looking for. I would like to suggest restoring this feature to the home page. Thank you.

Library response: The HSL webiste has not had any major upgrades recently and still has a search box.  However, what I think you may be looking for is a quick search of the library catalogue.  The McMaster Libraries catalogue had a major change at the beginning of May, with a temporary user interface in place.  Once this interface has been finalized, we will be adding the library search box back to our main page.  Thanks for letting us know that this is a useful feature. (Jun 8/11)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(May 17/11) I learned today that the journals at Thode will be put into storage, making it a much more difficult process for me to get the articles Id need for my research. Moreover, it means that quickly looking to see if an article would be useful before taking the journal out is now impossible. I understand the desire to make more study space, but please do consider making it just as easy for journals to be accessed, as they are an invaluable part of the research we do.

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to let us know your thoughts on moving the journals from the second floor of Thode. I certainly understand your concern about maintaining access to these volumes.

 

Balancing the need for increased user space with space for collections is a challenge facing nearly all university libraries. The second floor of Thode will become much needed study space for McMaster students.

 

Many of our journals are now received online as electronic resources, with only the older issues remaining in paper. The back issues of a journal are, of course, still important to research. When possible, the Library acquires online backfiles in order to provide direct and immediate access to the content of older issues. In cases where we do not have stable, ongoing electronic access to the older volumes, the Library will continue to provide access to these materials in print.

 

Relocating the print journal volumes within the building at Thode has been part of the Thode renovation planning process over the past several years, and was itself a result of public meetings regarding the renovations. We have posted a review of the planning process on our website at http://library.mcmaster.ca/news/8806. The journals are not being moved off-site and will remain physically located at Thode. 

 

Any print journal volumes that you need following their relocation can be requested online (http://library.mcmaster.ca/php/storage_thode.php?status=noncirc) and will be retrieved for you within one weekday of your request.

 

Please feel free to contact me directly if you have additional questions.

(May 19/11)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Thode  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(Apr 26/11) I was informed that the journals shelved on the second floor will be transferred to storage over the summer. Obviously this will make those resources less easily accessible. I understand that the space may be renovated to benefit students and their research, yet this change seems counter productive. I would like to suggest that the journals not be put into storage; perhaps an alternative shelving strategy can be looked into.

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to let us know your thoughts on moving the journals from the second floor of Thode. I certainly understand your concern about maintaining access to these volumes.

 

Balancing the need for increased user space with space for collections is a challenge facing nearly all university libraries. The second floor of Thode will become much needed study space for McMaster students.

 

Many of our journals are now received online as electronic resources, with only the older issues remaining in paper. The back issues of a journal are, of course, still important to research. When possible, the Library acquires online backfiles in order to provide direct and immediate access to the content of older issues. In cases where we do not have stable, ongoing electronic access to the older volumes, the Library will continue to provide access to these materials in print.

 

Relocating the print journal volumes within the building at Thode has been part of the Thode renovation planning process over the past several years, and was itself a result of public meetings regarding the renovations. The journals are not being moved off-site and will remain physically located at Thode. We have posted a review of the planning process on our website at http://library.mcmaster.ca/news/8806.

 

Any print journal volumes that you need following their relocation can be requested online (http://library.mcmaster.ca/php/storage_thode.php?status=noncirc) and will be retrieved for you within one weekday of your request.

 

Please feel free to contact me directly if you have additional questions.

(May 19/11)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Thode  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(Apr 26/11) Do not move the journals off of 2nd floor. Graduate students, professors, and undergrads, rely on those journals to write papers or run experiments. Moving the journals to an inaccessible location in the basement will retard research, which will affect grant money and recruitment. Remove some of the computers on the main level (that are often not used for study purposes) or get rid of the eatery (which shouldnt be in a library anyways) if you need more room, the journal articles are way more valuable than checking your facebook status or getting a coffee.

Library response:

Thank you for taking the time to let us know your thoughts on moving the journals from the second floor of Thode. I certainly understand your concern about maintaining access to these volumes.

 

Balancing the need for increased user space with space for collections is a challenge facing nearly all university libraries. The second floor of Thode will become much needed study space for McMaster students.

 

Many of our journals are now received online as electronic resources, with only the older issues remaining in paper. The back issues of a journal are, of course, still important to research. When possible, the Library acquires online backfiles in order to provide direct and immediate access to the content of older issues. In cases where we do not have stable, ongoing electronic access to the older volumes, the Library will continue to provide access to these materials in print.

 

Relocating the print journal volumes within the building at Thode has been part of the Thode renovation planning process over the past several years, and was itself a result of public meetings regarding the renovations. We have posted a review of the planning process on our website at http://library.mcmaster.ca/news/8806.

 

Any print journal volumes that you need following their relocation can be requested online (http://library.mcmaster.ca/php/storage_thode.php?status=noncirc) and will be retrieved for you within one weekday of your request.

 

Please feel free to contact me directly if you have additional questions.

(May 19/11)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Thode  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(Mar 22/11) Just thought you should know that GV 505 .M35 1997 and GV 1787 .T35 2003 are either not checked in as the database says or are improperly shelved.

Library response: Thanks for letting us know. We'll check on the whereabouts of these two items. (Mar 26/11)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
Add comment to this suggestion

(Jan 12/11) UpToDate is one of the most widespread and reliable sources for medically relevant information available in an electronic form. From speaking to various doctors, it is their recommendation as a source to turn to for medically relevant information. The fact that this resource is available on campus only is inconvenient, and I strongly recommend finding a way to allow accessibility of this resource through libaccess so that students can refer to it from locations other than campus.

Library response:

Thank you for your suggestion regarding UpToDate.  The Health Sciences Library licenses many excellent evidence-based resources;  unfortunately, UpToDate is not available off-campus.  The reason for this restriction is due to the fact that UpToDate is prohibitively expensive for universities to license for off-campus access.  An individual license is much more reasonable, and costs approximately as much as a standard medical textbook.  Purchasing an individual subscription is an option to consider if you find on-campus access inconvenient.  Another option would be to investigate our other evidence-base point-of-case resources : http://hsl.mcmaster.ca/resources/program/medicine/clinical.html

 Kind regards,

Andrea

(Jan 20/11)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Dec 11/10) Just wondering if there is a way at all to place a hold on a book through the internet? If there is such a feature, I would say that the designers of the McMaster library system have taken great efforts to make the website the worst user friendly Ive ever come across.

Thanks,

Library response:

You are correct.  The McMaster Libraries circulation system does not currently allow users to place holds via the internet.  We provide access on a first-come-first-serve basis due to the fact that the collection is in high demand throughout the academic term.

I am sorry to hear that you feel frustrated by the layout and design of the website. If you are having problems finding out more about policies or services please feel free to contact our service desks.

 

Kind regards,

Andrea McLellan,  Health Sciences Library

 

Service Desk contact numbers:

Health Sciences Library Information Desk : 22327

Innis Reference Desk : 22081

Mills Reference : 22533

Thode Reference : 22000

 

(Dec 16/10)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Jun 2/10) Today I needed to check out a book on reserve for a midterm I have tomorrow, however when I arrived, the book was already checked out (and there is only one copy). The textbook wasnt returned at the end of the two-hour time slot, and as a result, I had to scramble to get a hold of the textbook from another source!! This has happened to me before in another course. Can you please adjust your borrowing/return policies for books on reserve to ensure they are returned on time? Perhaps increase the fines, or restrict the book from being removed from the library so that the person can be tracked down.

Library response:

Thanks for submitting your comments.

Unfortunately, we have little control over when a person will return a reserve item.  However, we do our best to contact that person when an item is overdue.  If you find you have the same problem in the future, please inform our service desk staff and they will make sure the person is contacted right away and is asked to return the item as others are waiting to use it.

Our policy is that we do not routinely purchase textbooks for the library collection, and they are not often available as reserve items.  You can check the bookstore to see if they have the textbook you require for purchase if it's not available as a library reserve item.

Some of our reserve items are for "in library use only", but again, there is no guarantee that they will be returned exactly on time.  Thanks for your comment about increasing fines for reserve materials.  The information you have provided for us is good for us to know when we consider changes to our policies and fine amounts.

Please don't hesitate to communicate with our service desk staff if you encounter problems. They may be able to offer alternatives to you.

(Jun 4/10)
Answered by: Lynn Schneider (Supervisor, Circulation & Collection Maintenance, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Thode  |  Permalink
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(Feb 20/10) I think you should consider adding HeinOnline to the databases, I have come across it numerous times in my research and would like to be able to access these articles.

Library response: We have looked at HeinOnline - especially the Law Journals Collection (which gives full runs of journals, except for the most recent one or two years).  There is quite a bit of overlap with LexisNexis, but Hein goes back further.  I'd like to say that we can add it, but right now, we're only able to pick up new databases when we cancel others:  but we will keep Hein in mind as we evaluate our eresources. (Feb 22/10)
Answered by: Janice Adlington (Collections & Information Resources Librarian)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Dec 26/09) I would like to recommend a book that I used last semester at another college for purchase by the library. Information is as follows:
Title: Todays White Collar Crime: Legal, Investigative, & Theoretical Perspectives
Author: Brightman, Hank J.
Publisher: Routledge, 2009
ISBN: 978-0-415-99611-2
Price: $59.95
This book is very comprehensive, and covers a wide range of topics including corporate fraud, government corruption, computer crime, and other timely subjects.

Library response:

Thanks for your suggestion! I've added a copy of this to our book orders.

McMaster students, faculty, and staff are welcome to recommend purchases using the form on our website: http://library.mcmaster.ca/forms/recommend-book-journal. 

(Jan 8/10)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Nov 6/09) Hello, this is in regards to e-library usage. It would be EXTREMELY convenient if new windows opened when accessing resources/databases (in particular from health science library databases). If we are trying to use a resource (example, COCHRANE, OVID etc) the window opens in your current Mac session, meaning when you are finished you cannot return to Main Mcmaster/health science resources page without hitting the back button over and over and over again (which is often not possible or feasoble based on the number of references/results viewed). This leaves us to re-enter Mac homepage, then re-enter and log into libaccess, and start the whole process over again when we need to access a new database/resource.

Is this something that is in the works? Or am i missing something here?

thanks

Library response:

OK, so here is a solution which you can use to open a link in a new window.  Instead of left clicking to open the link, right click instead (or the reverse if you use a left-handed mouse as I do).   A menu should appear with the option "Open in New Window" or "Open Link in New WIndow".  Be sure that "libaccess.lib.mcmaster.ca" still appears in the URL in the new window; some browser settings lose the proxy access when they open a new window.  I hope this makes your searching more efficient, and saves your finger and your back button!

(Nov 8/09)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 28/09) It should be possible to order books through RACER which are only available electronically through McMaster. While the electronic format is great in some respects, it also means that I have to have access to a computer in order to review a book (and this isnt always possible). As a graduate student, I really need my work to be as portable as possible. Any chance that McMaster will revise its RACER policy?

Library response:

Thanks for your comment.  One of the reasons this policy is in place to help us manage our budget most effcetively. We don't have a budget large enough to permit the purchase of materials in multiple formats. The library has decided to select e-versions over print in many subject areas so that more people can access them at once, from anywhere, at any time. Another side to this is that you can access the e-book immediately, without having to wait for it to arrive through interlibrary loan. Many users appreciate this feature.

Please feel free to email me (pottier@mcmaster.ca) to see if we can find a solution for you.

 

(Oct 29/09)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Oct 13/09) I find it difficult to read textbooks online. Causes headaches & eye strain. Also frustrating when ovid continually boots you out. Would like more hard copies or texts. Thank you!

Library response:

Thank you for providing us with this useful feedback.  We have been purchasing and subscribing to ebooks for a number of years, but in the past couple of years we have greatly expanded this collection.  We have received feedback from students that they prefer to have some books in print format.  As you mentioned, the online environment is not great when reading for long periods of time.

We are not able to duplicate the format for every title we have available online ( ie purchase both print and online) . However, if you have a list of titles that you would like us to maintain in print format, please forward the list to me and I would be happy to investigate this further.

Kind regards,

Andrea mclell@mcmaster.ca

(Oct 13/09)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison),bannisl

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Aug 28/09) Ive noticed that the new library catalogue gives examples of what to type in the search bar. This isnt a bad idea, however, it has been set up poorly. If I type a search term into the bar and THEN choose title or author etc... it defaults back to the search example, so I have to retype my terms. Essentially, it forces you to choose your search category first and then type your terms. This is very counter-intuitive and frustrating. Could the system be changed so that once a term is typed the category can be changed without getting rid of the term?

Thank you

Library response: Thanks for reporting this problem. We are in the process of correcting it so that your search term is retained without defaulting back to the search example.  You should see this fix shortly. (Aug 28/09)
Answered by: Lynn Schneider (Supervisor, Circulation & Collection Maintenance, Health Sciences Library),bannisl

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Jun 28/09) Could the available criteria for searching the catalogues be extended to include page counts? Maybe a range could be given
by the catalogue user.

In certain subjects, the particular use of a given text is often related to its thickness (eg., math texts that are ungodly huge are
usually used in the classroom, and smaller ones elsewhere).

I know this suggestion sounds strange, but it would be a great help to have it carried out.

Thanks!

Library response: Thanks for the suggestion. In reality, our catalogue records don't contain page counts for all our books, so even if we did add that as a search option, the results would probably be misleading (providing results only for catalogue records *with* page counts, ignoring those without, even if they meet the page count searched for). Still, it's a useful suggestion and an interesting idea, so I'm adding it to our list of interface and functionality changes for the catalogue. We'll certainly investigate it further and implement the feature if we can! (Jul 9/09)
Answered by: Amanda Etches-Johnson (User Experience Librarian),bannisl

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Thode  |  Permalink
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(Jun 23/09) Please contact ISI (Web of Science) and complain that in a citation search that locates citations outside of the subscription set (I presume the subscribed are journals for which the get it icon appears) the message None of the Citing Articles are in your subscription is worse than unhelpful -- it is infuriating and unscientific. Why the heck not list citing data and let the user try to persuade his or her library to extend a subscription, or at least file an ILL request.

This happens eg. on seeking citations of the article by Kuznicki ZT, Ley M, Lezec HJ, et al of July 2006 in MATERIALS SCIENCE & ENGINEERING C-BIOMIMETIC AND SUPRAMOLECULAR SYSTEMS (special issue) SI961-965. To see the said reference, do a citation search on the 1997 parent - Clugston DA, Basore PA in PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS 5(4) 229-236 (its the third citation, and supposedly has 4 children, but you wont see by whom) !

Library response:

ISI has launched a new component within the Web of Knowledge:  the Conference Proceedings Citation Index.  Citation counts from this index now appear in the total, whether or not the institution has a subscription.  In this case, ISI has treated the reference you're interested in as a proceeding paper, and does not permit us to view any information about the articles which have cited it.  The Library is now considering our options or providing citation information.

   We received the following response from ISI to your comments:
"Thank you for this feedback. I have forwarded this to the product developer, our technical teams and the Sales Director. We have had many discussions about the way to handle citations to Proceedings data where it is not part of the regular subscription. I think the general consensus was
that users would prefer to see the total citation count even if they could not view all citations. In fact, this is the way the Web of Science has always functioned for users that did not subscribe to all 3 indexes. That said, we completely understand that some users may find this frustrating."

Please feel free to direct any further questions to Janice Adlington, eResources Librarian (adling@mcmaster.ca)

 

(Jun 24/09)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services),bannisl

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Jun 15/09) Patron would like to suggest that : Description of the International Bridge constructed over the Niagara River, near Fort Erie, Canada, and Buffalo, U.S. of America published 1873 be digitized because hes spoken with a number of Canadian historians, Fort Erie histoical society and historians at Brock University and this book is not known to them. Author Gzowski was the leading engineer in Canada at this time. this book contains maps and folio drawings and the condition is poor, brittle and disintegrating.
Carl Riff

Library response:

Thanks for the suggestion! The Library does have a digitization program underway for books that are no longer copyright protected, and we're certainly interested in knowing which books our users would like to have done.

I did check on this book and, unfortunately, our copy is too fragile to survive the scanning process. A copy from Harvard has been digitized and is available through both the Internet Archive (http://www.archive.org/details/descriptioninte00gzowgoog) and GoogleBooks (http://books.google.ca).

(Jun 23/09)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Other, Thode  |  Permalink
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(Feb 11/09) Although I was against having books put into storage after being scanned, I felt it was because I did not enjoy reading from the screen and would rather read from a book. I figured I was old fashioned and that I should get with the times. (As all young people are being told to do by those who produce the technology)

Anyway, I started reading the so called scanned books and half the time, they are useless to see online. Ill give a particular example.


Plastic deformation behavior of pure magnesium in the temperature range 4.2K--300K
by Bhattacharya, Basab, Ph.D., McMaster University (Canada), 2006, 302 pages; AAT NR28246


I encourge someone to look up that PhD Thesis up and go to pages 246ish to look at the TEM images that have been performed. They are impossible to see. TEM samples take weeks to prepare and analyze. Now they can no longer be appriciated or learned from.

Is this what we have to look forward to in the future? Personally, I would have rather bought my coffee from Tim Hortons and spent the extra money that went to build the cafateria at thode on a better scanner.

What can be done about such bad quality?

Library response:

Thank you for your comment. We appreciate you bringing this to our attention.

The thesis in question was digitized from microfilm by ProQuest and I would agree the images in this section of the thesis are quite poor. We will take a look at the original copy and see if we can't do better ourselves and replace these pages or make an alternate copy available.

If you would like me to communicate with you directly on when this updated copy might be available, please send me an email - pottier@mcmaster.ca

 Update: I have had this thesis re-digitized and the images are much better. Can you please send me an email so I can share this new file with you?  Thanks!  Anne Pottier (pottier@mcmaster.ca)

(Feb 11/09)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Jan 19/09) The sixth floor of Mills library really needs some TLC. More than once, I have been prohibited from taking out a book which I really needed because someone is stretched out, sleeping in the stacks. While I understand the need for a place to unwind at school (who doesnt!), the sixth floor should still be treated as though it is part of a library, not a hotel. I have noticed that the number of people sleeping on the floor is significantly less on the lower floors- isnt there a way to enforce this uniformly? I access most of my books from the sixth floor, and I know many other students in my discipline who do the same. The computer catalogue is also in a really awkward spot- is there any chance of putting the computer up against the wall like on the other library floors? The organization/maintenance of the other floors is really great- I would just like to see the same care given to the sixth, please! Thanks a bunch.

Library response:

Thanks for your comments. While we can't do much about where people choose to sleep, you can always ask them to move if you need access to the stacks and should feel free to do so. I do expect you find more people slumbering on the 6th floor since it tends to be quieter.

We will look into where the catalogue is placed to see if we can find a more suitable area. Sometimes this floor can be difficult to lay out since it is only a small part of a larger area.

 Thanks for bringing this to our attention.

(Jan 23/09)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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(Nov 26/08) Can you guys buy some Rich Dad series books? Thanks

Library response:

Thanks for the suggestion! We do have one, The ABC's of Building a Business Team that Wins, available at Innis. We'll take a look at the other books that are available in this series.

(Dec 4/08)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Nov 21/08) E-books ... so many drawbacks:
1)hard on the eyes 2)only access 1 week 3) only access one monitor, cant read at home ... weekends etc. 4)not user friendly
E-books are hard on older persons eyes (after 40) and are not user friendly. Id like to access the hard cover via ILL. [Two separate written suggestions dropped in the Suggestion Box, undated]

Library response: I agree that reading complete books on a computer screen is hard on anybody's eyes.  The reason we have moved to e-books is that so many of our users are no longer located on campus, and this allows them to be accessed from anywhere at any time.  However, there is definitely a need for printed books so we will investigate the possibility of still acquiring hardcopy of titles which we have electronically. (Nov 23/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Nov 17/08) My suggestion is to add to the list HeinsOnline Database: http://heinonline.org/

This is a very useful database; Ive come across a number of articles in varying disciplines (political science, philosophy, law) that only this database had - and I couldnt find them in any database available for McMaster students.

Library response:

Thanks for your suggestion. We will look into this resource and get back to you once we have learned more about it!

(Nov 17/08)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Nov 11/08) Why do you not subscribe to the following journal? There are many faculty, students and researchers at McMaster who would benefit from this journal:
Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine

Library response:

Thank you for bringing this title to our attention.  Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine has not been recommended for purchase in the past and we appreciate you taking the time to submit a request.  When considering a subscription for purchase we look at a number of aspects, including our budget, how many times the title has been request through Interlibrary Loan, and how often it is selected to view full text in our databases. At this time we have significant budget restraints.  Additionally, this title has not been requested often through Interlibrary Loan or through the Get It links in Embase. That being said, Respiratory Medicine is a strong area of interest at McMaster, and I have added the title to our recommendation list.  The recommendation file is reviewed periodically when budget conditions are favorable. Thanks once again for your recommendation.  If you wish to contact me via email, I can be reached at mclell@mcmaster.ca - Andrea McLellan  (Acting Head of Collections and Technical Services).

(Nov 24/08)
Answered by: Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library),Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison),Liz Bayley (Director, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Oct 27/08) I was wondering if the library could purchase the film Shake hands with the devil. I am aware that we have the documentary and the book. Thanks.

Library response:

Thanks for the suggestion. As you said the library does own the book and the documentary is available through the Lyons Instructional Media Centre. We did pass your recommendation along to Lyons. We do not purchase films for private viewing in the main library.

(Nov 25/08)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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(Oct 3/08) I just visited Thode Library to find a general book on a topic I need to learn about for my comprehensive exam. To my dismay I found that it was in the stacks in the basement. These stacks are very close together and the subject I needed to look at was at the floor level. I had to manoever myself to sit on the floor to look at the books as I could not bend over to reach them because of the confined space between the stacks. I am a healthy, fit, average sized student. If I were less flexible, larger or mobility impared it would be impossible for me to browse through the collections in these stacks. I suggest the stacks be spaced further apart.

As well, the tables in the basement are arranged in such a way that accessing the stacks is a challenge.

Library response: Thank you for making us aware of your concerns about the book stacks in Thode.  In order to renovate part of the first floor of the library it was necessary to relocate about half of the book collection to the lower level.  Although this arrangement is temporary, I cannot say definitively when the books will be moved to their final location,  elsewhere on the lower level, since further renovations are dependent on funding.  It is not practicable to respace the shelving but we can certainly look at rearranging the study tables so that access to the stacks is improved.  And if you require assistance retrieving something from the stacks please do not hesitate to ask at the Circulation Desk. (Oct 3/08)
Answered by: Kathy Ball (Library Director, Science & Engineering, University Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Thode  |  Permalink
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(Sep 17/08) I would like to suggest to the Mills Library to invest in a Manga collection. Manga are very popular and are amusing to read. The Universitys students will also benefit academically from manga because the department of religious studies offers a course called Religion and Popular Culture in Japan which discusses and analyzes Japanese pop culture and religion through manga and anime.

Library response:

We have added some graphic novels and similar items to the new Popular Reading collection in the Mills Learning Commons. Unfortunately, they haven't gotten much use, so I suspect we haven't chosen the right ones.

If you have some titles in mind that would be good additions, please use the form on the Popular Reading webpage (http://library.mcmaster.ca/popular-reading) to let us know!

(Sep 18/08)
Answered by: Wade Wyckoff (Associate University Librarian, Collections)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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(Sep 11/08) Does the library offer email alerts for overdue items?

Library response: Yes, the library now sends out email alerts for holds, recalls and overdues. Please see the library website at the following link for more details: http://library.mcmaster.ca/borrow/#EmailNotification  (Sep 12/08)
Answered by: Lynn Schneider (Supervisor, Circulation & Collection Maintenance, Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Aug 19/08) Hi,
I wanted to recommend having few book trucks/carts/ baskets for students to use while picking books in the different libraries( Mills in partiular). Is this idea feasible? At this time we are not allowed to use the trucks in the different floors.

Library response: We're looking into a solution for this, but that it may involve purchasing some new equipment.  It sounds like a great idea, so we'll post an update as soon as we can. (Oct 15/08)
Answered by: Catherine Baird (Marketing, Communications and Outreach Librarian)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Jun 11/08) Overall I would say that the library is fairly efficient for the students. However, I have a couple of really easy suggestions to assure that the staff assists, rather than conflicts, with Mcmaster Students. Firstly, if you have a large sign stating that the library closes at 5pm, close the library at 5pm (not 4:45). If the front desk closes at 4:45, but that in large print (rather than having it lie within the fine print-no one will read that if the large print is explicitly declaring closure at 5pm). Secondly, please fix your book recall system. Many of the students working over the summer are in dire need of specific literature. The system currently in place is not completely successful at recalling. Thirdly, the entire concept of having some books accessible online for 5 mins is rather absurd. E-books should be available for an indefinite time. Fourth, some of the staff has not been trained properly. I have been charged for returning a book on reserve too late, when in reality, a staff member didnt scan the book in the right manner. Really just some simple ideas that would help relieve some tension, and assure satisfaction among library users.

Library response:

 Thanks for taking the time to make so many suggestions.  I'm going to pass all of these along to different people in the library since they involve a number of different library operations.


Update:

Thanks for your comments about the closing signs in Mills Library. When we prepare to update these signs, we will certainly take this suggestion into consideration. In the meantime, our library hours on our web page give full details about openings and closings, and the closing tapes which start playing 1/2 hour before closing warn our patrons about the clearing of the stacks and study areas starting 15 minutes before the building is closed.

Regarding the recalls situation, we're a bit unclear about what the issue actually is from your comment. If these are materials for a course currently in session and your classmates need access, please ask your professor to put these materials on 2 hour reserve. This ensures access for everyone in your class. If this is not the issue, please let us know.

Concerning the short viewing time for some e-books: The purpose of the 5 minute time period is to give users a quick look to see if the book appears to be something they would be interested in using for a longer period of time. If so, there is then a choice to borrow the book for a term of 1 or 7 days, or to make a request that the library purchase a copy of the e-book. Loan requests are approved within 24 hours, but often as quckly as minutes after the request is submitted. Using this system permits the library to make an additional 50,000 ebooks available to our users, something we could not do if we have to purchase these outright. Please don't hesitate to let us know if you do encounter any difficulties using these titles. You are welcome to contact our Collections Services Librarian, Wade Wyckoff (wyckoff@mcmaster.ca)

 

(Jun 11/08)
Answered by: Catherine Baird (Marketing, Communications and Outreach Librarian),Donna Millard (Director, Library Services, Social Sciences and Humanities),Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Customer Service, Hours, Mills  |  Permalink
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(May 18/08) Dear Library representative
Just a suggestion. It would be a good idea that, when you are looking for e-books, you could choose to display only those e-books which have unrestricted access. That is, NOT displaying those that give you 5 minutes to browse.
Thanks

Library response:

Thanks for your message. We are offering ebooks in several ways. Those we subscribe to and those we purchase, but we are also offering access to more than 50,000 ebooks we don't own.

You can view these books for 5 minutes, then if you wish to use them longer, click on the option to Borrow for a period of 1 or 7 days, or recommend that we purchase the book. The link in the catalog reads: View e-book for 5 minutes and/or request a loan or purchase.

These requests are approved within 12 hours of being submitted, with many approved within the hour. By doing this we can offer our users access to many more titles than we can afford to purchase outright. If several users request a loan of an ebook, for which the library pays a fraction of the full cost for, we will then consider buying the book.

Give it a try! Don't hesitate to let us know if you have any problems with these books.

(May 21/08)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Thode  |  Permalink
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(May 12/08) It would be really great if the journals Methods in Enzymology and Methods in Molecular Biology were available online. There have been a number of times when I have needed an article from one of these journals but they are not available through your website. Thank you.

Library response:

Thank you for contacting us regarding online access to Methods in Enzymology.  This title has been on my list of titles to move to online for several years now.  The main reason for not cancelling our print subscription in favour of electronic has been cost; it is considerably more expensive to purchase the online version.  I will be sure to take your request for online access into consideration this coming year after I receive confirmation of the Health Sciences Library Collection Budget for 2008-09.

(May 13/08)
Answered by: Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(May 9/08) I have tried since late yesterday afternoon to get a PDF download from JSTORS with no luck. I have also tried to find the course reserve numbers for History 4E06E, instructor; Wesley Ferris also with no results.(the list begins at HTH....) I have, in desperation, tried to contact ANY live person at the Mills library since this morning and I am constantly dead ended into phone mail.

My sugestion is that you should fix these problems promptly and at least do me the courtesy of a call back.

[Patrons contact information removed]

Library response:

Thanks for your message. It appears that JSTOR recently upgraded its interface, and in doing so introduced some new "features". These are presenting themselves in several ways.

If you have a pop-up blocker you will appear to get an error when trying to view the pdf of an article. To resolve this, hold the CTRL key while clicking on the pdf link.

If you are on campus you may be asked to agree to the Terms and Conditions by clicking on a link. Once you accept these conditions you will be ported over to the pdf.

We have notified JSTOR to make sure they understand what users are now experiencing when trying to view a pdf article and we would hope that they will try to make improvements to this functionality.

Don't hesitate to bring any other problems with these resources to our attention.

(May 13/08)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Follow-up Comments:

To search for Reserves in Mills Library, please make sure you select Mills Reserve and then type in your Course code. Prof. Ferris materials are available on Reserve. (2008-05-21)


Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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(May 8/08) Itd be great if you could provide access to Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (cJASN). As you probably know Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN) is the most important Nephrology specialty journal with impact factor of about 7. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology about two years ago was divided into two journals: the traditional one (JASN) and clinical (cJASN). Since this journal has such a great importance to all specialists in kidney research, I feel McMaster health sciences library should help research community getting access to it.

Library response:

Thanks for indicating that this particular journal title is important to you.

I did some checking and I find that the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology does, in fact, appear in our library catalogue because there is a print copy of it in the library at St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton (Charlton Street location). You could go there to consult it, if you wish, or we can get copies of articles for you from that library if you request them through RACER, our online Interlibrary Loan system.

We do have an online subscription to the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology and there is a link on that site to the Clinical Journal, so that you are able to see the table of contents and abstracts of papers that way. Since we do not currently subscribe to the Clinical Journal, however, you cannot access the full text of articles in the Clinical Journal online.

I will pass your suggestion along to our Acting Head of Collections and Technical Services who will add this title to a list of those we consider for purchase when we have money to add titles.

In future, if you simply wish to recommend a title for purchase, you can always do so by using the book (http://library.lib.mcmaster.ca/php/bkrecomm.php) and journal (http://library.mcmaster.ca/php/jnlrecomm.php) recommendation forms found on our web site.

Thanks, again, for calling this title to our attention!

UPDATE: This title will be purchased by the Health Sciences Library. It will be available in electronic format. (May 22/08)

(May 8/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library),Andrea McLellan (Head of Collections and Technical Services, School of Medicine Liaison)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Apr 3/08) The lighting on the 6th floor is really dim. If possible could you get better lightbulbs as it would make reading easier.

Library response: Thanks for your suggestion. I suspect you are working in a group of carrels near the elevator. We added these carrels to try and add some more study space to this floor. The lighting here is admittly low. We will see if it is possible to improve the lighting level. (Apr 6/08)
Answered by: Catherine Baird (Marketing, Communications and Outreach Librarian),Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases  |  Permalink
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(Apr 3/08) I feel that more attention should be payed to the sixth floor. Personally, I believe that wi-fi should be accessible to all students. Furthermore the exit on 2nd floor should be open at all times as it would reduce heavy traffic along the main corridor. Thank you.

Library response:

Thanks for your email. We agree that the 6th floor could be better used. We are continuously looking at the spaces available to us and try to repurpose them to meet the needs of our users. We will eventually look at the 6th floor, but it won't be for some time yet. As you will see at the following link, most of the rest of Mills library is wireless (http://library.mcmaster.ca/mills/study.htm).

The doors on the 2nd floor are only used when the Learning Commons is open and the rest of the library is not. It is possible that this might change in the future, if the library were funded to remain open 24 hours per day. Please note a 24/7 pilot to keep the Learning Commons open during the spring exam period will begin on April 9th and run to April 28th.

(Apr 6/08)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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(Apr 1/08) My suggestion or comment is on the librarys fine on laptops. It is currently $20 if you are pass the 3hr limit. I understand the need others have for these services however I find $20 a bit steep. Obviously, students do not intend to bring computers back late if they do. Perhaps a lowering of the fine would be more reasonable for students who obviously cant even afford a computer of their own.

Library response:

Thanks for commenting on the way you perceive our fines for overdue laptops; we need to know that people find the fines steep. Unfortunately, however, there is little chance of these fines being reduced at all in the near future.

We have very limited numbers of laptops to lend in all campus libraries and large demand for them.  As you might imagine, when fines are set up for untimely return, it is because the material is not being returned on time (if it was, we would not need to charge fines).  We must have some method of impressing on borrowers the importance of using this loaned equipment in a timely fashion and a penalty for non-compliance seems to work better than anything else. If we charged only $5.00 per hour (or part) overdue, or only $10.00, people would think: "Oh, I can afford to pay that for another 30 minutes' use" and be even tardier than they are now. The threat of a $20.00 fine per hour for tardy return has seemed to keep most of those who might be tempted to forget the time on the "straight-and-narrow" path.

Reduction of the rate of this fine would send to borrowers the message that it doesn't cost much to delay return of the borrowed laptop. It would further inconvenience those waiting to get a laptop from our lending programmes and create a disservice to everyone. There has been discussion among staff of raising the fine which we have resisted to this point.  I don't believe that your suggestion to reduce the fine for overdue laptops is going to be one we can adopt.

(Apr 2/08)
Answered by: Tom Flemming (Head of Public Services, McMaster University Health Sciences Library)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Computers/WiFi/Printers, Health Sciences  |  Permalink
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(Feb 3/08) Sunday Feb 3, 2008 - Its freezing in the learning commons! Please turn on the heat.

Library response: We are sorry about the cold temperatures in the Learning Commons. We received comments from several people and did contact Physical Plant right away asking that they address the problem. We are following up with them this morning (Monday)to see what can be done to make sure this does not happen again. (Feb 4/08)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services),Catherine Baird (Marketing, Communications and Outreach Librarian)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Temperature, Mills  |  Permalink
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(Jan 25/08) Please spend more money on books! I am a graduate student writing my dissertation and I constantly have to order books through RACER. Waiting a week or two to receive books hinders my research and thought processes. The books I am ordering are not esoteric or rare. They are standard sources most other libraries have. Libraries are about books! Please buy more of them.

Library response: Unfortunately the library budget does not permit the purchase of all the books which might be appropriate for a university library. What subject are you studying? You are welcome to suggest books you would like to see added to the collection, although it may not be possible to purchase them all. A book recommendation form can be found at: http://library.mcmaster.ca/cat-coll/coll/recommend.htm (Jan 29/08)
Answered by: Anne Pottier (Associate University Librarian, Library Services),Catherine Baird (Marketing, Communications and Outreach Librarian)

Categories: Books/Journals/Databases, Mills  |  Permalink
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