Library News

Construction underway on new home for renowned Bertrand Russell Archive

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections
88 Forsythe Ave. N, across from McMaster’s Sterling Avenue entrance, will be the new home of McMaster University Library’s renowned Bertrand Russell Archives. The new space is scheduled to open this spring.

88 Forsythe Ave. N, across from McMaster’s Sterling Avenue entrance, will be the new home of McMaster University Library’s renowned Bertrand Russell Archives. The space is scheduled to open this spring.

McMaster’s renowned Bertrand Russell Archives – the university’s largest research collection –  will soon have a new home.

This spring, both the  Bertrand Russell Archives, and McMaster’s Bertrand Russell Research Centre will move from Mills Memorial Library to a new space at 88 Forsythe Ave. N – across from the university’s Sterling Avenue entrance.

Construction is now underway to convert the two-storey, 4300 sq. ft. space into a fully accessible, customized facility, that will ensure the proper storage and preservation of the archives, and also support a range of research activities related to Russell scholarship.

The archives will be located on the first floor, along with a reading room and display areas that will feature items from the collection including Russell’s personal writing desk and armchair. The second storey will house the Bertrand Russell Research Centre, complete with offices and a conference room.

“This unique space will allow us to support Russell scholarship and showcase this remarkable archive in a new, more engaging way,” says Vivian Lewis, McMaster University Librarian. “Not only will it provide a fitting new home for one of the university’s most significant cultural assets, it will serve as a centre of intellectual activity for current and future generations of scholars who continue to be inspired by Russell’s work.”

Considered one of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century, Nobel laureate, Bertrand Russell (1872–1970), was a British philosopher, logician, social critic, and renowned peace advocate, whose work continues to be the subject of significant international scholarship. The archive is the largest available on Russell anywhere and is regularly used by scholars from around the world.

The archives first came to McMaster University Library in 1968 and has remained among the most significant collections in the Library’s William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections. The archive contains Russell’s personal library, along with his correspondence, manuscripts, tapes, films, photographs, his Nobel Medal in Literature and his writing desk.

The new space at 88 Forsythe Ave. N will open in the spring of 2018. The opening will be part of a year of celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of the Library’s acquisition of the Bertrand Russell Archives.

 


Science Literacy Week 2017

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Thode
Join McMaster University Library during the week of September 18-24, 2017 for a great lineup of events and activities in celebration of Science Literacy Week.

Join McMaster University Library during the week of September 18-24, 2017 for a great lineup of events and activities in celebration of Science Literacy Week.

Science Literacy Week is an opportunity to celebrate the science that is happening all around us on campus and across Canada. Join McMaster University Library and our partners during the week of September 18-24, 2017 for a great lineup of events and activities.

Follow @ThodeLibrary on Twitter to participate in our week-long trivia contest, and test your science knowledge on our arcade cabinet.

TEDxMcMasterUSalon Lunchtime series

TEDx Salons are smaller gatherings that allow attendees to interact with the speakers and discuss with like-minded audience members. Drs. Gibala and McNeill will be sharing their journeys as science communicators, and encouraging the audience to think about how we can better communicate science to the public.

Sept. 19 – Dr. Martin Gibala, The Science of Fitness: Translating the Message
12:00-1:00pm, outside the Thode Library Makerspace (Lower Level)

Over the last decade, high-intensity interval training has evolved from a niche training method for serious athletes to the top fitness trend worldwide. Martin Gibala’s research team at McMaster has been at the forefront of this exploding field of science, conducting groundbreaking studies on time-efficient workouts to boost health and fitness. Gibala has conducted hundreds of television, radio and print interviews with outlets ranging from The New York Times and TIME to Conan and Reddit. Together with Chris Shulgan, a journalist and the co-author of his bestselling book, The One-Minute Workout, Gibala will discuss his experience translating the fitness message, including the opportunities, challenges and potential pitfalls of science communication.

Sept. 21 – Dr. Fiona McNeill, Fighting Fake News: the Need for Scientists to Speak Up!
12:00-1:00pm, outside the Thode Library Makerspace (Lower Level)

Recently, we have seen our world filled with stories of ‘fake news’ and ‘alternative facts’ and this is extending into science. For example, the New York Times recently published a climate change denying op-ed, and news radio hosts have been calling hurricane forecasts ‘hoaxes’. More than ever, the world is going to need scientists who are prepared to enter the public eye, and talk about their work. Fiona McNeill is going to talk about her experiences with ‘fake news’ and engage in a discussion of the steps scientists can and must take and the consequences for our world if they don't.

Science Invasion of Mills Library
Sept. 18-22, 11:30am-1:30pm, Mills Library Lobby

Breaking free of the confines of Thode Library, Science Literacy Week is invading Mills Library with the help of McMaster’s Let’s Talk Science crew. Monday through Friday, take a few minutes out of your day to check out cool science demos from Let’s Talk Science volunteers, and learn a little, too.

Thode Makerspace Workshop Series

*All events take place in the Thode Library Makerspace, on the lower level

The Poetry of Science with Hamilton Youth Poets
Sept. 19, 6:30-8:30p
m

Science and poetry give us the unique ability to understand the world around us. There is a way to take abstract concepts and turn them into art to make them more accessible. The McMaster Space Initiative and Hamilton Youth Poets invite you to join them in this first writing workshop of two to learn the art of weaving science into poetry. Mentors from HYP will give a tutorial on basic poetry creating techniques.

Digital Literacy: Skills and Strategies for Navigating an Era of Fake News, Conspiracism, and Systemic Distrust – a workshop with Dr. Mark Busser
Sept. 20, 12:00-1:00pm

At a time when many of us read our news through the medium of social media, how do we know which stories to trust? This workshop on digital literacy will examine the problem of fake news, explore the roots of conspiracism and the general distrust in scientific communities and authorities. We will learn how to recognize types of fake news and identify the telltale signs of fake news sites. In order to turn our cynicism about the news industry towards a healthy skepticism, we will explore some interdisciplinary remedies to curb the systemic distrust in science.

IT Security Hygiene – Protecting Your Information
Sept. 20, 6:00-7:00pm

Presenter: Wayde Nie, Manager, Servers, Storage and Architecture, UTS
How valuable is your MacID?  What are some safeguards and best practices that can be used to improve security and privacy at work? This presentation is geared toward reviewing basic principles of IT Security hygiene, with a focus on our responsibilities as individuals to protect our MacIDs, safeguard our systems and network, and to be a good digital citizen on the McMaster Domain.

Energy and Sustainability Workshop
Sept. 21, 6:00-8:15pm

McMaster Undergraduate Energy Society (6-7pm)

Presenters: Zainab Husain (VP Events & Campus Outreach) & Nelson Mok (VP Academic)
Through this workshop, we want to debunk some important myths about the energy industry and give students a snapshot of what powers their daily lives. Broken down into simple concepts a multidisciplinary audience can understand, we aim to give students a better understanding of clean energy of today and what innovations are being made to make it more sustainable.

Engineers Without Borders, McMaster Chapter (7:15-8:15pm)

Sustainable development is defined as the development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Through this interactive case study, we will explore the framework for creating local and global sustainable development and the challenges that come along with it!

It Takes Two: How Iron Gall Ink Accelerates Paper Degradation
Sept. 22, 12:30-1:20pm

Presenters: Audrie Schell and Itxel Castro-Soto, Conservators
In this session, McMaster University Library’s conservators will talk about the science of book and paper preservation.  It all starts with chemical structure of cellulose which is the major component of paper, and how hydrolysis and oxidation affect those structures. Making matters more complicated is Iron Gall ink, the primary ink in use for many centuries, which accelerates paper decay.

Electronics for the Rest of us!
Sept. 22, 5:00-9:00pm & Sept. 23, 10:30am-4:30pm
Limited Enrollment: 
Full details and registration details

To most of us, the workings of the electronic devices that accompany (and enable!) our everyday lives often seem mysterious and opaque -- an area of concern for only the most qualified ‘techies’.  This doesn’t need to be the case. This two-day workshop will give students an opportunity to develop their skills by designing and building a functional electronic device.

Planetarium Show: Matters of Size
Sept. 20, 7:00pm & 8:15pm, W.J. McCallion Planetarium, Burke Science Building

Registration preferred but tickets may also be available at the door. Tickets: $7 per person

It is an astounding fact that the laws of Nature at different scales can be understood separately---e.g., you don't need to know about atoms to know how a baseball soars into the stands. Still more remarkable is that astronomy affords us opportunities to study science at almost all scales. In this show, we'll see examples of how astronomy can be used to study the very small, the very large, and the very in-between

Events happening throughout Hamilton: 

Terryberry Public Library (100 Mohawk Rd. W., Hamilton. 905-546-3921) 

*Pre-Registration required for many events

TED Talks for Science Literacy Week – Sept. 18, 2:30pm

Intro to Code with Ozobots – Sept. 18, 4:00pm Ages 8-12

Appy Hour – Sept. 19, 2:30pm

Polar Bears: Life in the Arctic – Sept. 20, 7:00pm

Science4Fun: Here Comes the Light, Light and More Light – Sept. 21, 4:00pm. Ages 8 - 12

2 minutes and 18 seconds in the Shadow of the Moon – Sept. 21, 7:00pm

Saltfleet Public Library (131 Gray Rd., Stoney Creek. 905-662-8611)

The Past, Present and Future of Planet 9 – Sept. 18, 6:00pm
Pre-Registration required

Kenilworth Public Library (103 Kenilworth Ave. N., Hamilton. 905-546-3960)

Protecting Pollinators in Hamilton – Sept. 20, 11:00am
Pre-Registration required


Human Library inspires conversations on university and community

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Mills Learning Commons
The event, hosted by McMaster University Library as part of McMaster’s Common Reading Program, featured a number of ‘living books,” including McMaster President Patrick Deane, who spoke to students about their own diverse experiences and who invited open conversations with students on a range of topics.

The event, hosted by McMaster University Library, featured a number of ‘living books,” including McMaster President Patrick Deane, who spoke to students about their own diverse experiences and invited open conversations with students on a range of topics. PHOTO BY SHERRI MURRAY

McMaster students took part in lively conversations about university and community at the Human Library event held recently in the Learning Commons of Mills Library.

The event, hosted by McMaster University Library as part of McMaster’s Common Reading Program, featured a number of ‘living books” who spoke to students about their own diverse experiences and who invited open conversations with students on a range of topics.

The event featured a talk and book signing from this year’s Common Reading Program author, Zoe Whittall, author of The Best Kind of People and was also an opportunity for students to learn more about the services and resources available through McMaster’s libraries.

This year’s living books included:

Dr. Patrick Deane
The seventh President and Vice-Chancellor of McMaster University, a position he has held since 2010. As President, Dr. Deane’s priorities include promotion of and increased support for research, strengthening connections between the University and the local and global communities we serve, and ensuring a distinctive, personalized, and engaging experience for McMaster’s students.

Chukky Ibe
A poet, playwright, politico, and literature nerd. He was born in Lagos-Nigeria and has built his home in Hamilton. He has authored three collections of poetry and four plays. Chukky spends most of his time teaching poetry in schools and community centres in Hamilton. He is also McMaster’s MSU president.

Cole Gately

A trans person living in Hamilton Ontario who teaches part-time at McMaster University in the Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours) program. Cole is a liminal being who occupies that space between genders, races, classes and sexuality.

Dr. Gary and Joy Warner

An interracial couple committed to peace, human rights, social, and environmental justice, and spirituality. Joy was national Chair of Voice of Women for Peace, is a part-time Raging Granny, and the Justice, Peace, and Integrity of Creation Coordinator for the Spiritan Congregation in Canada. Gary has worked in international and local community development, including as CUSO Country Coordinator in Sierra Leone, Director of McMaster International, and Board Chair, HCF.

Liam and Lily at Mac

Liam and Lily are Library Dogs! Liam heads the team of canines that regularly visit the McMaster University Libraries. Liam is a fully certified therapy dog. He is on-campus every other week to give students a healthy break from studying, and to provide students a connection to the pets they have left behind at home. Lily is a fully trained therapy dog who works with her human, who just happens to be one of the Social Sciences Academic Advisors.

To learn more about The Common Reading Program and for a full list of “living books,” visit the Student Success Centre’s website.

Common Reading Program partners include: Office of Alumni Advancement, Arts & Science Program, School of Graduate Studies, McMaster University Library, Office of the President, Faculty of Humanities, Equity and Inclusion Office and Residence Life Office (Housing and Conference Services) and the Student Success Centre.


New Library Catalogue is here

Submitted by libwyckoff on
Filed under Library News:  Alerts Archives & Research Collections e-Resources Instruction Lyons New Media Centre Maps, Data, GIS Research @ McMaster Thode Web Resources

The University Library and Health Sciences Library have now launched the new Library Catalogue.

On the University Library and Health Sciences Library websites, you will find Quick Search, which integrates journal articles with books and other library collections, as well as options to search only the catalogue and a refreshed 'classic' catalogue. We’ve created an FAQ document with tips and information about the new search interfaces that may be helpful in getting started.

User accounts, including the ability to place holds and recalls, are once again available. All of your currently checked-out items should appear in your account. Library accounts now have PIN codes in order to make them more secure. You will be prompted to create a PIN the first time you log in. Here’s how:

  1. Click on Account/Renewals from the Library homepage or select My Library Account from the top right corner of the catalogue page.
  2. On the login screen, enter the 14-digit barcode number on your McMaster ID card. Leave the PIN field blank. Click Submit.
  3. When you are prompted to enter a new PIN, choose a numeric code at least 4 digits long.

The system will log you into your account and save your PIN. The next time you need to access your account, enter both pieces of information on the login screen. Always remember to log out of your account, especially when using a public or shared computer.

If you have questions about the new search interfaces or the features available from your user account, please feel free to contact us. We appreciate your patience during the transition over the last few days.

 

 


New Library catalogue Aug. 16: What’s new, how to get ready

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Alerts Innis Mills Thode
Screen shot of new Library catalogue system

The University Library and Health Sciences Library's new catalogue system includes a number of new features including an inproved search interface that integrates journal articles with books and other library collections.

The University Library and Health Sciences Library will be launching a new library catalogue in the coming weeks.

The system, which will launch on Wednesday August 16, brings with it new library accounts as well as a host of new features. The most visible change will be an improved search interface that integrates journal articles with books and other library collections. A refreshed 'classic' catalogue will also be available on the University Library and Health Sciences Library websites.

All existing checkouts and hold requests will move automatically to the new system and will appear in users' new accounts. Those with lists of items saved in their existing account will need to take steps to export their lists to the new system. The steps are outlined below.

New Features: 

  • Create a PIN code to keep your library account secure.
  • Keep a list of library materials that you’ve checked out and returned to the library by turning on Reading History in your user account.
  • Receive text messages alerting you to new information about your checkouts or hold requests by turning on SMS Messages in your user account.
  • Request books from Mills, Thode, or Innis Libraries and have them waiting for you at the service desk. (And, of course, browsing and self-serve from the shelves is always available!) 

How to prepare: 

Before October 31, you will need to export any lists of items that you have saved in your existing user account.

Option 1: Export your lists from your account and import to your preferred citation management tool. The main Library Catalogue interface on our website makes it easy to export your lists to EndNote, EndNote Web, and RefWorks, and in more general citation file formats BibTeX and RIS. After the new catalogue is launched, use this link to access your previous library account and retrieve your lists.

Note that if you've created lists using the Classic Catalogue they are separate from those in the main catalogue. You can print or e-mail those lists after logging into your account from the Classic Catalogue, or follow the steps below.

Option 2: After August 16, you can recreate your lists in your new user account by following the steps below:

  1. Do a search in the new catalogue for an item on your list.
  2. Click the folder icon under "Additional actions" for your item in either the search results or the record detail page.
  3. Repeat steps 1-2 for each item on your list.
  4. Click the My Folder link at the top right corner of the page.
  5. Select (check) the items you want to save to a list.
  6. Choose Save to List from the action toolbar.
  7. If you are not logged in, you will be prompted to log into your account.
  8. Once you are logged in, the system displays the Save to My List form. From here, you can either:
    1. Choose an existing list from the drop-down menu and click the Add button to add the items to an existing list.
    2. Or, click Save to new list to start a new list of items. If you create a new list, enter a name and description, and then click Create.

The Libraries are excited to bring you these new features and to provide an updated search interface that better integrates our physical and electronic collections.

If you have questions about these changes, please feel free to contact us. We appreciate your patience and support as we've worked through the changes and roll out of this new library services platform.


2017/18 Graduate Residency in Digital Scholarship: Apply now

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Mills

The Ruth and Lewis Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship invites applications for the 2017-2018 Graduate Residency in Digital Scholarship.

The residency program is designed to assist outstanding graduate students who are interested in developing digital scholarship as a component of their research and to involve them in a scholarly community engaged in digital scholarship at McMaster University and beyond.

Current or accepted graduate students from all Faculties at McMaster University may apply.

The deadline for applications is Friday, September 8 at 5:00 p.m.

Learn more about the 2017-2018 Graduate Residency in Digital Scholarship 


Mapping a nation: McMaster's Canadian rare maps

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Maps, Data, GIS

McMaster Univeristy Library has an extensive and varied collection of maps that help chart the evolution of Canada. The following video explores some of the rare and historic Canadian maps contained in the Library's Lloyd Reeds Map Collection, dating back as far as the 16th century.

Discover more rare Canadian maps from McMaster's collection in a special online collection curated by McMaster's map experts.


New international journal explores Students as Partners in teaching and learning

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  e-Resources
(From left) Anita Ntem, an undergraduate student from Bryn Mawr College and Lucy Mercer-Mapstone, a PhD student at the University of Queensland. speak at the launch of the International Journal for Students as Partners. Both students are members of the journal’s editorial team. The journal was developed in partnership with the MacPherson Institute and is hosted by McMaster University Library Press.

(From left) Anita Ntem, an undergraduate student from Bryn Mawr College and Lucy Mercer-Mapstone, a PhD student at the University of Queensland speak at the launch of the International Journal for Students as Partners. Both students are members of the journal’s editorial team. The journal was developed in partnership with the MacPherson Institute and is hosted by McMaster University Library Press.

A new online journal, hosted by McMaster University Library Press, is exploring how students are working in partnership with faculty and staff to enhance teaching and learning in higher education.

The International Journal for Students as Partners (IJSaP) developed by the Paul R. MacPherson Institute for Leadership, Innovation and Excellence in Teaching – with the guidance of an advisory group made up of international experts – contains scholarship focused on emerging perspectives, practices and policies related to faculty-student partnerships in teaching and learning in higher education.

The journal, which is peer-reviewed and open access, is accepting scholarly articles, case studies, opinion pieces, reflective essays, and reviews in the area of “Students as Partners,” an emerging field of scholarship that involves students as co-creators, co-researchers, co-teachers, co-producers and co-designers in teaching and learning.

IJSaP is inviting international submissions particularly those co-authored by students and faculty or staff. The first issue was published in May and includes contributions by 21 students and 28 faculty or staff from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Vivian Lewis, McMaster University Librarian and member of the International Advisory Group for IJSaP, says increasingly, fully digital, open access journals like IJSaP represent the future of scholarly publishing.

“Times have changed and new, open access journals are emerging and beginning to take prominence,” says Lewis. “Also, the ‘born digital’ format both dramatically reduces the time from the original submission to final posting without jeopardizing the rigorous peer-review process, and allows visual and other digital media to be incorporated into submissions. We are proud to be a part of this innovative undertaking and to host this journal on our open access, online platform.”

In addition to IJSaP, McMaster University Library Press (MULPress) hosts a number of high-quality, peer-reviewed journals on its platform. To see a list of student journals published by the Library, please visit Student Journals @ McMaster University.

For questions about IJSAP, or to send comments, please send an email to ijsap@mcmaster.ca, or to start an open access, peer-reviewed, faculty or student journal, please contact scom@mcmaster.ca.

International Journal for Students as Partners logo.


Canada 150: From McMaster’s Archives

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections
Materials from the collections of (from top left) Bruce Cockburn, Margaret Laurence (from bottom left) Pauline Johnson and Pierre Berton are among the artifacts featured in a new video series created to commemorate Canada 150.

Materials from the collections of (from top left) Bruce Cockburn, Margaret Laurence (from bottom left) Pauline Johnson and Pierre Berton are among the artifacts featured in a new video series created to commemorate Canada 150.

In celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary, archivists in McMaster University Library’s William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections have delved into the Library’s holdings to select artifacts that help shine a light on some of Canada’s most beloved figures, our national heritage, and our place in the world.

In the following videos, McMaster archivists Rick Stapleton, Renu Barrett,  Myron Groover and Bridget Whittle help to tell Canada's story by looking at our past:

Farley Mowat, Canadian literary icon, environmentalist and recipient of the Order of Canada.

Pierre Berton, author, broadcaster and journalist, who received the Governor General's Award for non-fiction multiple times and was a recipient of the Order of Canada.

Margaret Laurence, one of Canada’s best known literary figures who twice won the Governor General’s Award for Fiction among many other accolades.<style>

World War I and World War II: McMaster archives provide a personal and poignant glimpse into the reality of war through the letters and personal effects of McMaster students who served.

Pauline Johnson, performer, writer, humourist and feminist of Mohawk and English descent who, throughout her distinguished career, travelled across the country 19 times.<style>

Bruce Cockburn, singer-songwriter, environmental activist and recipient of the Order of Canada who was also inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame.

Basil Johnston, Indigenous writer, revered storyteller and preserver of the Anishinaabe language.

Jack McClelland, renowned Canadian publisher.<style>

 


Library joins with other research-intensive universities to preserve low-demand books, journals

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Innis Mills Thode
McMaster Library is partnering with four Ontario research intensive universities on a state-of-the-art storage facility that will preserve seldom used print materials, while increasing space within the library for study, research and collaboration.

McMaster Library is partnering with four Ontario research-intensive universities on a state-of-the-art storage facility that will preserve seldom-used print materials, while increasing space within the library for study, research and collaboration.

McMaster University Library is collaborating with libraries at four of Ontario’s largest, research-intensive universities in a new joint program to ensure that infrequently used scholarly material is preserved and readily accessible to students and researchers for generations to come.

Through the Keep@Downsview partnership, McMaster, the University of Toronto, University of Ottawa, Western University and Queen's University will share a high-density storage facility designed to provide a secure, environmentally controlled space for the long-term preservation of valuable, but seldom-used print journals and books.

McMaster University Librarian Vivian Lewis says the Library’s participation in the partnership is part of a larger movement in higher education for universities to collaborate and share resources and costs in support of both current and future scholars.

With demands on space increasing while research collections continue to grow, she says moving seldom used items to the facility – located at the University of Toronto’s Downsview campus – will also increase library space for study, research and collaboration.

“We believe it’s essential for these very low-demand but important collections to remain available to McMaster’s academic community well into the future,” says Lewis.  “Participating in the Keep@Downsview partnership allows us to work with other research-intensive universities to preserve this material in a secure, cost-effective way, while creating space within the library to foster new types of scholarship, offer new library services, and support both collaborative and individual work.”

Locating and requesting materials will be seamless for McMaster Library users. All titles transferred to Downsview will continue to appear in the Library’s catalogue where they can be requested and quickly returned to campus if needed. Users can also request on-demand scanning of journal articles and book chapters which will be delivered in PDF format.

While McMaster currently has a storage facility for low-use material located in Dundas, Lewis says it is not equipped for long-term preservation and adds that, over time, materials in this facility will be moved to the Downsview facility or returned to the campus libraries, depending upon their usage.

Keep@Downsview was funded, in part, through the Ministry of Training Colleges and the Universities Productivity and Innovation Fund. Some capital and all operating costs will be shared amongst the five universities.

Read an FAQ document to learn more about how Keep@Downsview will work at McMaster.  Read an overview of the Keep@Downsview program


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