Library News

New international journal explores Students as Partners in teaching and learning

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Filed under Library News:  e-Resources
(From left) Anita Ntem, an undergraduate student from Bryn Mawr College and Lucy Mercer-Mapstone, a PhD student at the University of Queensland. speak at the launch of the International Journal for Students as Partners. Both students are members of the journal’s editorial team. The journal was developed in partnership with the MacPherson Institute and is hosted by McMaster University Library Press.

(From left) Anita Ntem, an undergraduate student from Bryn Mawr College and Lucy Mercer-Mapstone, a PhD student at the University of Queensland speak at the launch of the International Journal for Students as Partners. Both students are members of the journal’s editorial team. The journal was developed in partnership with the MacPherson Institute and is hosted by McMaster University Library Press.

A new online journal, hosted by McMaster University Library Press, is exploring how students are working in partnership with faculty and staff to enhance teaching and learning in higher education.

The International Journal for Students as Partners (IJSaP) developed by the Paul R. MacPherson Institute for Leadership, Innovation and Excellence in Teaching – with the guidance of an advisory group made up of international experts – contains scholarship focused on emerging perspectives, practices and policies related to faculty-student partnerships in teaching and learning in higher education.

The journal, which is peer-reviewed and open access, is accepting scholarly articles, case studies, opinion pieces, reflective essays, and reviews in the area of “Students as Partners,” an emerging field of scholarship that involves students as co-creators, co-researchers, co-teachers, co-producers and co-designers in teaching and learning.

IJSaP is inviting international submissions particularly those co-authored by students and faculty or staff. The first issue was published in May and includes contributions by 21 students and 28 faculty or staff from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States.

Vivian Lewis, McMaster University Librarian and member of the International Advisory Group for IJSaP, says increasingly, fully digital, open access journals like IJSaP represent the future of scholarly publishing.

“Times have changed and new, open access journals are emerging and beginning to take prominence,” says Lewis. “Also, the ‘born digital’ format both dramatically reduces the time from the original submission to final posting without jeopardizing the rigorous peer-review process, and allows visual and other digital media to be incorporated into submissions. We are proud to be a part of this innovative undertaking and to host this journal on our open access, online platform.”

In addition to IJSaP, McMaster University Library Press (MULPress) hosts a number of high-quality, peer-reviewed journals on its platform. To see a list of student journals published by the Library, please visit Student Journals @ McMaster University.

For questions about IJSAP, or to send comments, please send an email to ijsap@mcmaster.ca, or to start an open access, peer-reviewed, faculty or student journal, please contact scom@mcmaster.ca.

International Journal for Students as Partners logo.


Canada 150: From McMaster’s Archives

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Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections
Materials from the collections of (from top left) Bruce Cockburn, Margaret Laurence (from bottom left) Pauline Johnson and Pierre Berton are among the artifacts featured in a new video series created to commemorate Canada 150.

Materials from the collections of (from top left) Bruce Cockburn, Margaret Laurence (from bottom left) Pauline Johnson and Pierre Berton are among the artifacts featured in a new video series created to commemorate Canada 150.

In celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary, archivists in McMaster University Library’s William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections have delved into the Library’s holdings to select artifacts that help shine a light on some of Canada’s most beloved figures, our national heritage, and our place in the world.

In the following videos, McMaster archivists Rick Stapleton, Renu Barrett,  Myron Groover and Bridget Whittle help to tell Canada's story by looking at our past:

Farley Mowat, Canadian literary icon, environmentalist and recipient of the Order of Canada.

Pierre Berton, author, broadcaster and journalist, who received the Governor General's Award for non-fiction multiple times and was a recipient of the Order of Canada.

Margaret Laurence, one of Canada’s best known literary figures who twice won the Governor General’s Award for Fiction among many other accolades.<style>

World War I and World War II: McMaster archives provide a personal and poignant glimpse into the reality of war through the letters and personal effects of McMaster students who served.

Pauline Johnson, performer, writer, humourist and feminist of Mohawk and English descent who, throughout her distinguished career, travelled across the country 19 times.<style>

Bruce Cockburn, singer-songwriter, environmental activist and recipient of the Order of Canada who was also inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame.

Basil Johnston, Indigenous writer, revered storyteller and preserver of the Anishinaabe language.

Jack McClelland, renowned Canadian publisher.<style>

 


Library joins with other research-intensive universities to preserve low-demand books, journals

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Filed under Library News:  Innis Mills Thode
McMaster Library is partnering with four Ontario research intensive universities on a state-of-the-art storage facility that will preserve seldom used print materials, while increasing space within the library for study, research and collaboration.

McMaster Library is partnering with four Ontario research-intensive universities on a state-of-the-art storage facility that will preserve seldom-used print materials, while increasing space within the library for study, research and collaboration.

McMaster University Library is collaborating with libraries at four of Ontario’s largest, research-intensive universities in a new joint program to ensure that infrequently used scholarly material is preserved and readily accessible to students and researchers for generations to come.

Through the Keep@Downsview partnership, McMaster, the University of Toronto, University of Ottawa, Western University and Queen's University will share a high-density storage facility designed to provide a secure, environmentally controlled space for the long-term preservation of valuable, but seldom-used print journals and books.

McMaster University Librarian Vivian Lewis says the Library’s participation in the partnership is part of a larger movement in higher education for universities to collaborate and share resources and costs in support of both current and future scholars.

With demands on space increasing while research collections continue to grow, she says moving seldom used items to the facility – located at the University of Toronto’s Downsview campus – will also increase library space for study, research and collaboration.

“We believe it’s essential for these very low-demand but important collections to remain available to McMaster’s academic community well into the future,” says Lewis.  “Participating in the Keep@Downsview partnership allows us to work with other research-intensive universities to preserve this material in a secure, cost-effective way, while creating space within the library to foster new types of scholarship, offer new library services, and support both collaborative and individual work.”

Locating and requesting materials will be seamless for McMaster Library users. All titles transferred to Downsview will continue to appear in the Library’s catalogue where they can be requested and quickly returned to campus if needed. Users can also request on-demand scanning of journal articles and book chapters which will be delivered in PDF format.

While McMaster currently has a storage facility for low-use material located in Dundas, Lewis says it is not equipped for long-term preservation and adds that, over time, materials in this facility will be moved to the Downsview facility or returned to the campus libraries, depending upon their usage.

Keep@Downsview was funded, in part, through the Ministry of Training Colleges and the Universities Productivity and Innovation Fund. Some capital and all operating costs will be shared amongst the five universities.

Read an FAQ document to learn more about how Keep@Downsview will work at McMaster.  Read an overview of the Keep@Downsview program


New medals display sheds light on the extraordinary life and career of Henry Thode

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Filed under Library News:  Thode
Medals awarded to former McMaster President Henry G. Thode (1910-1997) are part of a special exhibit on display in Thode Library that sheds light on the extraordinary accomplishments of one of Canada’s most celebrated scientists.

Medals awarded to former McMaster President Henry G. Thode (1910-1997) are part of a special exhibit on display in Thode Library that sheds light on the extraordinary accomplishments of one of Canada’s most celebrated scientists.

He was an internationally-renowned scientist, a pioneer in harnessing atomic energy for peaceful purposes, and one of McMaster’s most visionary leaders.

Now, medals awarded to former McMaster President Henry G. Thode (1910-1997) are part of a special exhibit that sheds light on the extraordinary accomplishments of one of Canada’s most celebrated scientists.

The exhibit, now on display in McMaster’s H.G Thode Library of Science and Engineering, showcases 16 of the many medals awarded to Thode throughout his distinguished life and career.

Thode was recognized globally as a leading geochemist and nuclear scientist whose work spanned a number of scientific disciplines. But to those that knew him personally, he was also a modest and unassuming man with a deep love of knowledge who, as both a farmer and a musician, had many interests and abilities that extended well beyond his work as a researcher and administrator.

He designed and constructed Canada’s first mass spectrometer – an instrument that measures isotopes and produces fissionable materials for use in nuclear reactors. During World War II, while on a leave of absence from McMaster, he was a pivotal member of the Atomic Energy Project of the National Research Council in Montreal, conducting research that would later be instrumental in the development of the CANDU reactor and Canada’s nuclear energy industry.

Recognizing the potential of radioisotopes for use in medicine, Thode helped establish a medical research department at McMaster where he, along with Charles Jaimet, investigated the use of radioactive iodine in the diagnosis and treatment of thyroid disease, the first medical application of radioactive iodine in Canada.

Thode’s later isotope research focused on the geological history of the Earth and the solar system. He was one of only two Canadians to obtain rock samples from the lunar landing in 1969, studying the samples to understand the origins and geological structure of the moon.

Over his career, which spanned six decades, Thode was honoured by governments and scientific societies around the world, including in China, Germany, Britain, and the United States.

He was made a member of the Order of the British Empire for his wartime contributions to atomic research. He also received the prestigious Arthur L. Day Award from the Geological Society of America. in 1943, at the age of 33, he was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and in 1967 he was one of the first 10 Canadians, and the first scientist, to be made a Companion of the Order of Canada. All these medals are contained in the display.

“Henry Thode was a scientist of international stature whose groundbreaking work cemented McMaster’s reputation as a research institution,” says Robert Baker, McMaster’s vice-president, Research. “The breadth and significance of the medals showcased in this exhibit are a reflection of the profound global significance and lasting legacy of his work, the impact of which continues to be felt at McMaster and around the world.”

Thode first came to McMaster as an associate professor of chemistry in 1939, and held many key roles at the university including director of research and head of the Department of Chemistry from 1948-1952. He was the principal of Hamilton College (an affiliated college dedicated to science) from 1949-1957. He was named vice-president of McMaster in 1957 and served as president and vice-chancellor from 1962-1972.

He oversaw an unprecedented era of expansion at the university which included the construction of the McMaster Nuclear Reactor, the McMaster Health Sciences Centre, the Engineering building (now the John Hodgins Engineering Building), the Senior Sciences Building (now AN Bourns Science Building), the Arts complex, as well as the founding of McMaster’s world-renowned medical school.

The medals came to McMaster from the estate of Henry Thode through his son, Patrick Thode. They are part of the Henry G. Thode archive, which is housed in McMaster University Library’s William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections.


Studio Arts students turn trash into treasure in new Thode Makerspace

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Filed under Library News:  Thode
Students in a Studio Art Media Installation and Performance course were introduced to the basics of electronics in a workshop held in the new Thode Makerspace. During the workshop, students transformed old electronics and computing hardware into works of art.

Students in a Studio Art Media Installation and Performance course were introduced to the basics of electronics in a workshop held in the new Thode Makerspace. During the workshop, students transformed old electronics and computing hardware into works of art.

McMaster students are turning used computer hardware into works of art and learning about electronics in the process.

Students in Chris Myhr’s Studio Art Media Installation and Performance course were introduced to electronics and do-it-yourself culture during a recent workshop led by Montreal-based artist Peter Flemming, which was held in the newly launched Thode Makerspace.*

During the workshop, students transformed old electronics and computing hardware, much of which was donated by McMaster University Library, to create a variety of art objects and to learn about ‘upcycling,’ the creative reuse of materials to create something new.

“We received screens, old computers, and laptops. We turned these into works of art and gave them a second life,” says Myhr, an associate professor in McMaster’s Department of Communications Studies and Multimedia, who adds that one of the goals of the course is to demystify technology for his students so it can be repurposed into art.

Myhr says the new Makerspace provides a flexible workspace where students can spread out and work with technology. “Without this space, the workshop wouldn’t have happened,” he says.

*The Thode Makerspace is a partnership between McMaster University Library and the Faculty of Engineering. The Makerspace, located in the lower level Thode Library, is a new experiential learning space on campus where students from all Faculties can create, collaborate, and experiment with a range of technologies.


New Thode Makerspace a place to play, collaborate and innovate

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Filed under Library News:  Thode
 The newly launched Thode Makerspace, a partnership between McMaster University Library and McMaster’s Faculty of Engineering, will have a range of both high and low tech equipment avaialbe for use by students from all Faculties including 3D printers like the one pictured here.

 The newly launched Thode Makerspace, a partnership between McMaster University Library and McMaster’s Faculty of Engineering, will have a range of both high and low tech equipment available for use by students from all Faculties including 3D printers like the one pictured here.

Aspiring innovators from all Faculties have a new experiential learning space on campus where they can create, collaborate, and experiment with a range of technologies.

The newly launched Thode Makerspace, a partnership between McMaster University Library and the Faculty of Engineering, offers students, faculty and staff from all disciplines a space to learn technical skills, develop new technologies and work collaboratively, while sharing ideas, equipment and knowledge.

Located on the lower level of Thode Library, the Makerspace provides access to a variety of high and low-tech tools and technologies as well as hands-on workshops and training for all skill levels. The facility will also connect students to experts and mentors at McMaster’s start-up incubator and entrepreneurship initiative, The Forge.

McMaster University Librarian, Vivian Lewis says she hopes the Makerspace will serve as a place for learning and experimentation, where students share knowledge and work collaboratively across disciplines.

“I think this Makerspace is quite extraordinary,” says Lewis. “We tend to think of makerspaces as high-tech machine shops, spaces for technological experimentation and idea prototyping, but this is also a place where students from all parts of campus can come together to learn and to build – a space where humanities students can partner with students from science or business or social sciences. It’s intended to be a truly interdisciplinary space.”

“Innovation happens when Engineers collide and collaborate with people from other disciplines,” says Ishwar K. Puri, Dean of McMaster’s Faculty of Engineering. “Over the past few years we’ve really invested in building collision spaces like the Makerspace. You need community spaces where people can come and create and work on problems in an interdisciplinary way. That’s the kind of vibrant atmosphere we want to provide for students.”

The Makerspace will offer a range of equipment including 3D printers, a variety of hand tools, components for building electronic circuitry, a drill press, grinders, soldering stations, a laser cutter and even a chip setter that will enable students to make computer chips. Going forward, equipment will added based on needs identified by the students using the space.

The facility will be open to students on a drop-in basis and will be available to groups on campus who need a space to work on technology-based projects. Programming will include talks by Hamilton start-up entrepreneurs organized in partnership with The Forge, as well as other skills development activities and networking opportunities for students.

Colin McDonald, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Director of Engineering I, helped to design the Makerspace and has already brought students into the facility to “play.”

“We need spaces where students can tinker and to be exposed to things that they might not otherwise get to be exposed to,” says McDonald. “A space like this gets students thinking and brainstorming out of the classroom. It takes students who have a common way of thinking amongst their peers and gets them thinking a little bit differently. When people who think differently collaborate, you get more innovative solutions. That’s one of the big benefits of a space like this.”

Visit the Makerspace website for more information.

The newly launched Thode Makerspace offers students, faculty and staff from all disciplines a space to learn technical skills, develop new technologies and work collaboratively, while sharing ideas, equipment and knowledge.

The newly launched Thode Makerspace offers students, faculty and staff from all disciplines a space to learn technical skills, develop new technologies and work collaboratively, while sharing ideas, equipment and knowledge.


Two repositories offer open access options for researchers

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Filed under Library News:  Mills

SocArXiv, a new subject repository, is giving social science researchers a place to publish pre-print versions of their articles.

Run by researchers, this non-profit, open access, repository is one option that enables authors to make their publications available to everyone.

By posting pre-prints* in SocArXiv, authors can benefit from feedback before final publication. They can also benefit from wider and more timely readership of their research and the potential for future collaborations. By hosting a pre-print of journal publications, SocArXiv allows readers to access social science scholarship without paywalls.

Another open access option available to researchers is MacSphere, McMaster’s institutional repository. MacSphere includes pre-prints, post-prints and final versions of journal articles as allowed by the publishers. With the exception of McMaster theses, which students may embargo for up to one year, the content in MacSphere is fully open for everyone to access and read. The repository infrastructure allows the metadata in MacSphere to be fully searchable using search engines such as Google Scholar.

Uploading a post-print or a final version of an article to MacSphere may allow authors who have been granted public, federal funding from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) or the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), on or after May 1, 2015, to comply with the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications.

To make a submission in SocArXiv, click here

To make a submission in MacSphere, click here

SocArXiv and MacSphere are two of many online repositories which are available for author self-archiving of journal articles and other published works. Make your research known and post your article in an open repository today!

If you have any questions about SocArXiv, please contact Tina Fetner, Sociology Department, tina.fetner@mcmaster.ca

If you have any questions about MacSphere, please send an email to the Office of Scholarly Communication, scom@mcmaster.ca

*Most publishers allow article pre-prints to be made open access. To be sure, an author can search the SHERPA/RoMEO database to determine a publisher’s open access policies for self-archiving.

SocARXIV, a social sciences open access repository, logo

MacSphere logo


New student art display offers unique views of Hamilton

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Filed under Library News:  Maps, Data, GIS

Students in New Directions in Painting and Drawing (ART 3PD3) looked at fire insurance maps, like the one pictured here (left), in McMaster University Library’s Lloyd Reed Map Collection to find inspiration for a series of paintings (one of which is pictured right) featured in an exhibit of student art now on display in the President’s Corridor.

A new exhibit created by McMaster Studio Art students is using dramatic vantage points, unique source materials, and a range of mediums to explore Hamilton through art.

The works are part of Hamilton: The View from Here, a collection of abstract art now on display in the President’s Corridor, part of the course work of students from three different Studio Arts classes and inspired by the urban, industrial and natural landscapes of Hamilton.

“The overarching theme is Hamilton – the idea of looking at the city as a starting point for making art and thinking about art as being connected to where you are,” says Judy Major-Girardin, Associate Professor in McMaster School of the Arts and course instructor for all three classes.

Students in Book Arts (ART 3BA3) and Environmentally Responsible Art (ART 2ER3) went up the Stelco Tower, Hamilton’s second tallest building, to get a 360 degree, bird’s eye view of the entire Hamilton region. From the 20th floor, students created small, fold-out books and small paintings that captured a range of views of the city, from distant landscapes to the urban cityscape below.

The exhibit also includes a series of 4 ft. by 4 ft. paintings of Hamilton informed by maps from McMaster University Library’s Lloyd Reeds Map Collection. Students in New Directions in Painting and Drawing (ART 3PD3) visited the collection, located in Mills Library, where Map Specialist, Gord Beck talked to them about the elements of map-making – an art form in its own right – and brought out a wide selection of maps ranging from centuries-old rare maps to aerial photos. Students also looked at maps specific to Hamilton including soil maps and fire insurance maps.

“I’ve worked in the Map Collection twenty years now but continue to be amazed at the range of uses our maps are applied to,” says Beck. “I’m especially grateful to innovative professors like Judy—without them, many non-geography students overlook what we have to offer them.”

Beck adds that he was “blown away” by how much content he found identifiable in these abstract works. “I shouldn’t have been so surprised—after all, cartography speaks the same language of colours and symbols, just with a different accent,” he says.

The largest and most complex piece in the exhibit is a 4 ft. by 8 ft. map of Hamilton made entirely of felt, a recently added medium for the Studio Art program.  22 students in Major-Girardin’s second year Environmentally Responsible Art class each worked on a small section of the map. The pieces were then stitched together to create a cohesive whole.

4 ft. by 8 ft. map of Hamilton made entirely of felt, was created by 22 students in Major-Girardin’s second year Environmentally Responsible Art class. The materials used to create the map were provided through a generous donation by Alyx Fitzhenry, part of a gift to support the introduction of fibre arts into McMaster’s Studio Arts program.

The materials used to create the map were provided through a generous donation by Alyx Fitzhenry, part of a gift to support the introduction of fibre arts into McMaster’s Studio Arts program.

“There’s a variety of experiences embodies in the work in this exhibit,” says Major-Girardin. “There’s so much in our environment and on campus that we can tap into that can invigorate and enhance student learning.  Artists tend to work in isolated mind-spaces most of the time, but what is of value in this exhibit is that there were opportunities to learn from other people and to share. Sometimes you have to shake things up a bit to make that happen.”

The works will be on display in the President’s Corridor until the end of August.


McMaster map helping commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Vimy Ridge

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Filed under Library News:  Maps, Data, GIS
A map from McMaster’s WWI collection is serving as the background for a special exhibit now on display Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France. The exhibit features 3D reproductions of military crests and insignias carved by Canadian soldiers into the walls of the underground tunnels where they waited for the Battle of Vimy Ridge to begin.  Exhibit images Copyright CANADIGM 2016. Used with permission.

A map from McMaster’s WWI collection is serving as the background for a special exhibit now on display at the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France. The exhibit features 3D reproductions of military crests and insignias carved by Canadian soldiers into the walls of the underground tunnels where they waited for the Battle of Vimy Ridge to begin.  Exhibit images Copyright CANADIGM 2016. Used with permission.

On Easter Monday, 1917, four Canadian divisions stormed Vimy Ridge.

100 years later, a map from McMaster’s WWI map collection is part of Souterrain Impressions,  a special exhibit now on display at the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France created to commemorate those who fought in the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

The map, a trench map of the area surrounding Vimy Ridge, is providing the backdrop for the exhibit, which features 3D reproductions of military crests and insignias carved by Canadian soldiers into the wall of an underground tunnel where they waited – some for weeks on end – for the Battle of Vimy Ridge to begin.

The carvings – which can still be found in the tunnel, ten meters below ground – were captured using laser image scanners, then reproduced using 3D printers and other processes. The exhibit is made up of a series of displays that contain reproductions of these carvings as well as a number of drawings that were also found on the wall of the tunnel.

“The map is used as the background for each display. It ties the entire exhibit together and that was key for us,” says Zenon Andrusyszyn, Executive Director of the Canadian Historical Document and Imaging Group (CANADIGM), the organization that created the exhibit.  “When you look at the map, you get a sense of the area and how complicated it all was. It’s a really nice connection between the individuals we’re featuring in the exhibit and the actual battle”

The map is dated February, 1917 – just two months before the battle – and according to Gord Beck,  Map Specialist in McMaster University Library’s Lloyd Reed Map Collection, provides the most accurate picture available of what the area looked like at the time.

“This map shows exactly what the configuration of the trenches was just before battle,” says Beck. “It shows where the tunnel entrances and exits were, it shows where the barbed wire was, the machine gun posts, where the enemy guns were. Anybody studying the map at the time would have been able to see all that detail.”

Beck says McMaster’s collection of WWI trench maps and WWI aerial photographs are among the best in the world, adding that what makes the collection unique is that the maps have been digitized and are available to researchers online through the Library’s Digital Archive.

“No other university has a WWI map collection like we have,” he says. “Because we invested a lot of time and effort into digitization early on, McMaster has become the main presence on the web when it comes to WWI maps and aerial photographs.”

In fact, Andrusyszyn says it was after finding the map online that he contacted McMaster to inquire about including it in the exhibit.

“I’m glad McMaster has these maps, because it’s very difficult to get a hold of these things,” he says. “The fact the McMaster has a collection this good is fabulous – it’s really critical to doing any kind of work like this.”

Souterrain Impressions is currently on display in the newly opened Visitors Education Centre at the Canadian National Vimy Memorial in France. The exhibit has also traveled to London (ON), Montreal and New Brunswick as well as the Canadian Embassy in Washington DC.


10 ways McMaster libraries can help you get exam-ready

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Filed under Library News:  Innis Mills Thode
blurred image of students walking quickly through the lobby of Mills Library.

McMaster University Library has countless resources to help students at any time of year, but during the exam period when stress levels soar and students are studying feverishly, Mills, Innis and Thode Libraries have lots of services that can help make this hectic time a bit easier.

1. Trouble focusing? There's an app for that!

Relax, learn to manage your stress, and improve your ability to focus with Muse brain-sensing headbands. Using seven sensors to detect and measure brain activity and Bluetooth to send this information to the free Muse app, the headbands provide a one-of-a-kind interactive meditating experience. Muse provides feedback on your meditation by translating your brain signals into the sights and sounds of wind, which are stormy when the mind is active and settled when the mind is calm. The app reports on your session and progress, adjusts your goals, and challenges you to remain calm for increasing lengths of time. Visit the Library Services Desk in Mills, Thode or Innis Libraries to borrow the headbands for up to a week.

2. Forgot your headphones?

You’re all set up for an intense study session at the library, and realize that you forgot your headphones! You can still enjoy your favourite study playlist by borrowing headphones for four hours at a time from the Service Desk in Mills, Innis or Thode Libraries with your library card.

3. Banish stress at the Lyons New Media Centre 

What could be more relaxing than origami? Visit the desk at the Lyons New Media Centre for fun and creative ways to relieve your stress. Ask for origami paper and start folding away. Check out some pencil crayons and grab a colouring sheet. Handicrafts more your style? Sign out some yarn and needles and knit for a spell.

4. Food or drink, anyone?

Vending machines with snacks and beverages are now available and being stocked in Mills, Innis and Thode libraries.

5. Just add a cute dog

Liam the Library dog is a certified therapy dog who loves attention from students! Visit with Liam on April 20. Liam will be in Innis Library at 11:00 – 11:30, Mills Library from 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m., and Thode Library from 3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

6. Innis Library De-Stress Zone 

Take a break in the Innis Library De-Stress Zone, which includes range of activities and treats to help you decompress including colouring materials, puzzles, cookies and apples. Be sure to participate in our contest to win a prize!

7. Thode Library Stress Busters 

Visit Thode Library throughout the exam period and de-stress with puzzles, colouring and games.

8. Past Exams

The Library has a range of past exams from Humanities, Social Sciences, Business, Commerce Engineering and Science courses that can help you be more prepared. Find exams here.

9. Read...for fun!

Need a break from study notes and text books? Visit the Hamilton Public Library Open Library, located next to the Mills Services desk.  The Open Library is a donated collection of popular reads and magazines from Hamilton Public Library.  Students are welcome to select a book to read. No need to bring the book back, it’s yours to keep or to share.

10. Ssshh!!

Quiet study can be found in the following spaces:

  • 6th floor of Mills Library – silent study
  • Area on 4th floor of Mills Library (down the ramp on the west side)
  • All areas on 3rd and 4th floors of Mills Library
  • Silent late night study in Innis Library, Mon-Thurs, 11:00 p.m. – 2:45 a.m.
  • Lower level of Thode Library, as well as a small silent study room also in the lower level
  • NEW THIS TERM –Quiet study in Mills Connections Centre, 1st floor (evenings and weekends)

Find out more information about study spaces in McMaster libraries.

Library Hours for the exam period are as follows:

  • Staring April 7, Mills Library will be open Monday to Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 10:45 p.m., Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 10:45 p.m., Sunday noon to 10:45 p.m. The Learning Commons will be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
  • From April 7 –April 26, Thode Library will be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week; The Reactor Cafe will be open from 10:00 a.m.– 11:00 p.m.
  • Starting April 7, Innis Library will be open from 8:30 a.m. – 2:45 a.m., Mon–Thurs, Friday 8:30 a.m. - 10:45 p.m., Sat. 10:30 a.m. – 5:45 p.m., Sun. 1:00 p.m.– 7:45pm

The Libraries will also be open extended hours on Good Friday.


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