Library News

12 ways the Library can help you get exam-ready

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Innis Mills Thode
This exam period, when stress levels soar and students are studying feverishly, Mills, Innis and Thode Libraries have lots of services that can help make this hectic time a bit easier.

McMaster University Library has countless resources to help students at any time of year, but during the exam period when stress levels soar and students are studying feverishly, Mills, Innis and Thode Libraries have lots of services that can help make this hectic time a bit easier:

1. Trouble focusing? There’s an app for that!

Relax, learn to manage your stress, and improve your ability to focus with Muse brain-sensing headbands. Using seven sensors to detect and measure brain activity and Bluetooth to send this information to the free Muse app, the headbands provide a one-of-a-kind interactive meditating experience. Muse provides feedback on your meditation by translating your brain signals into the sights and sounds of wind, which are stormy when the mind is active and settled when the mind is calm. The app reports on your session and progress, adjusts your goals, and challenges you to remain calm for increasing lengths of time. Visit the Library Services Desk in Mills, Thode or Innis Libraries to borrow the headbands for up to a week.

2. How do you like them apples?

Need a healthy snack to keep you going? The Library is offering free apples to students. Apples can be found in the Learning Commons help desk and at Thode and Innis Libraries – help yourself and enjoy!

3. Unwind in the Thode Makerspace

Come to the Thode Makerspace to destress before your exams! Making some cool crafts is a great way to destress and take your mind off exams. 3D print or Laser cut some ornaments, make a pouch for your phone, or create your first circuit! This will be going on until the last day of exams so feel free to drop in anytime we are open. The Makerspace is located in the basement of Thode Library.

4. Just add a cute dog

Liam the Library dog is a certified therapy dog who loves attention from students! Visit with Liam on Wednesday December 13. Liam will be in Innis Library at 11:00 a.m., Mills Library at 1:00 p.m., and Thode Library at 3:00 p.m.

5. Thode Library Services and Stress Busters

Thode Library is offering a range of activities and resources to help make exams a bit less stressful:

  • Thode Meditation Station: get away from it all in Thode Library’s meditation room. Grab some earplugs and tune out, or borrow a Muse headband and calm your mind with a little help from technology. (1/2hr – 1hr room booking, 1 person at a time)
  • An ongoing collective puzzle challenge! Take a break and help solve a puzzle together
  • Board games and puzzles to borrow
  • Forgot your calculator? Borrow one from the services desk.

6. Forgot your headphones?

You’re all set up for an intense study session at the library, and realize that you forgot your headphones! You can still enjoy your favourite study playlist by borrowing headphones for four hours at a time from the Service Desk in Mills, Innis or Thode Libraries with your library card.

7. Spark your curiosity and creativity at Lyons New Media Centre

Get creative in the Lyons New Media Centre (LNMC). Colouring sheets and pencil crayons, knitting, and origami are available, as well as VR glasses, and robots for students to sign out and play with. Some items can only be used within LNMC, some can be signed out for up to 24 hours. Click here for more information.

8. Innis Library De-Stress Zone

Take a break in the Innis Library De-Stress Zone, which includes a range of activities to help you decompress including colouring materials, puzzles, a word search, and crosswords. Students who complete the Innis Library related word search, can submit it to our Service Desk for the chance to win a prize pack that includes Library swag, the Stats Canada 150 humour book, treats, and head massager.

9. Unwind at Mills Library

Mills Library will have board games and puzzles available for students – just visit the main floor service desk to sign them out.

10. Food or drink, anyone?

Vending machines with snacks and beverages are now available and being stocked in Mills, Innis and Thode libraries.

11. Past Exams

The Library has a range of past exams from Humanities, Social Sciences, Business, Commerce Engineering and Science courses that can help you be more prepared. Find exams here.

12. Ssshh!!

Quiet study can be found in the following spaces:

  • The Connections Centre in Mills [1st floor]
  • 6th floor of Mills Library [Silent Study floor]
  • Area on the west side of the 4thth floor of Mills Library [down the ramp]
  • All areas on 3rd and 4th floors of Mills Library
  • Silent late night study in Innis Library, Mon-Thurs, 11:00 p.m. – 2:45 a.m.
  • Lower level of Thode Library, as well as a small silent study room also in the lower level

LIBRARY HOURS FOR THE EXAM PERIOD ARE AS FOLLOWS:

Thode library is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week until the end of the exam period.

Innis Library is open Monday to Thursday: 8:30 a.m. to 2:00 a.m., Friday: 8:30 a.m. to 11p.m., Saturday: 10:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Sunday: 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Mills Library is open Monday to Friday 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., Saturday: 10:30 a.m. to 11:00 p.m., Sunday: 12:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.

The Mills Learning Commons is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week until the end of the exam period.

 

 

 


Library Toy & Food Drive Nov. 21-Dec. 12

Submitted by libperkovic on
Filed under Library News:  Events Innis Mills Thode

The Libraries’ 41st annual Toy & Food Drive will be held Nov. 21—Dec. 12, 2017. All items collected through this drive will go to local Hamilton charities.

New unwrapped toys for girls and boys up to the age of 16, non-perishable food items, gift certificates/cards for teens, and items for family pets are needed. Your continued support is very much appreciated!

Need gift ideas? Here are some suggestions …

  • books
  • building blocks
  • colouring books, crayons and/or markers
  • craft kits
  • dolls or action characters/figures and accessories
  • electronics (MP3 players, etc.).
  • games
  • gift certificates/cards (movie passes, music stores, shopping malls)
  • makeup, hair essentials and accessories
  • model kits
  • puzzles
  • sports items, equipment, accessories

Why not start a toy-drive in your office, residence or department? Donations can be dropped off at a collection box at your nearest campus library (Mills, Innis, Thode or the Health Sciences Library).


Archives of beloved storyteller Stuart McLean find new home at McMaster

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections
The archives of Stuart McLean – CBC journalist, best-selling author and host of the perennially popular radio program the Vinyl Cafe – have found a new home at McMaster.

The archives of Stuart McLean – CBC journalist, best-selling author and host of the perennially popular radio program the Vinyl Cafe – have found a new home at McMaster.

He is remembered as one of this country’s most beloved storytellers.

Throughout Stuart McLean’s 40-year career as a CBC journalist, best-selling author and host of the perennially popular radio program the Vinyl Cafe, his stories – along with his signature warmth and sense of humour – resonated with audiences across the nation and continue to hold an enduring place in the hearts of many Canadians.

Now McLean’s extensive personal and literary archive, which offers insight into his life and work and provides a unique behind-the-scenes look at the Vinyl Cafe, has found a new home at McMaster.

From manuscripts of his iconic and award-winning stories and books, to correspondence, photographs, fan mail, sound recordings, and even set pieces from his live Vinyl Cafe performances, the archive –  which McLean donated to McMaster University Library before his death­ earlier this year – includes a wealth of material that provides scholars and the public with the opportunity to explore both aspects of his life and his remarkable body of work.

We are delighted that McMaster University will be the home to Stuart’s archives,” write McLean’s sons Christopher Trowbridge, Robert McLean and Andrew McLean. “This is something that Stuart started working on a few years ago. He loved combing through old letters, manuscripts, photos and scraps of paper. He spent months meticulously collecting and boxing up work and correspondence from the past five decades.”

“We know how happy it made Stuart to know that his archive would find a home a McMaster,” they add. “We hope others will take as much pleasure in it as he did.”

The archive, part of the William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections, is made up of 100 boxes, or 16 metres, of material. It includes a diverse range of items including boxes filled with notepads used by McLean to scribble down story ideas, as well as personal correspondence with notable figures such as fellow authors Margaret Atwood, Farley Mowat and Timothy Findley, among many others.

It also features hundreds of original manuscripts, such as the much-loved story “Dave Cooks the Turkey,” complete with hand-written notes added by McLean and his editors which provide valuable insight into the creative writing process.

Over his prolific and varied career, which included teaching in Ryerson University’s School of Journalism, McLean worked on and contributed to some of the biggest shows in radio. He was an award-winning documentary producer on CBC’s Sunday Morning and was a regular columnist and guest host on CBC’s Morningside with Peter Gzowski which inspired his national bestseller, The Morningside World of Stuart McLean.

But he was best known for the Vinyl Cafe, a weekly radio show that first aired in 1994 and which quickly became a Canadian institution. It featured a mix of stories, essays and musical performances and later evolved into a touring show, allowing McLean to share both his love of performance and passion for storytelling with audiences across Canada.

“Stuart loved sharing his work with the world. He often talked about how lucky he was to be there for the moment of ‘giving and receiving’ the moment where he was able to share his work with an audience,” says McLean’s long-time producer, Jess Milton.

“That’s why I wasn’t surprised when he told me he wanted his archive to be public,” she continues. “He wanted to share his work. He always invited others to join in. I’m delighted that, even though Stuart is gone, we will be able to continue to be part of his work and his process, and that future generations will be able to explore the extraordinary contribution that Stuart’s work made to the tapestry of Canada.”

McLean’s archives join those of many other renowned Canadian authors in McMaster University Library’s collection including Farley Mowat, Pierre Berton, Margaret Laurence, and Austin Clarke.

“We are honoured that McMaster is the permanent home of Stuart’s outstanding body of work,” says McMaster University Librarian, Vivian Lewis. “We are proud to be the stewards of this rich legacy, which will be an invaluable resource to those studying, or engaged in the creative process and to those interested in understanding the significant impact Stuart’s work had on Canadian culture.”

McLean garnered many accolades throughout his career. He was an officer of the Order of Canada, and a three-time winner of the prestigious Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour. He received honourary doctorates from a number of Canadian universities, including from McMaster in 2014.

Watch Stuart McLean’s 2014 McMaster convocation address

Few writers or performers have left so great a mark on this country as Stuart McLean,” says McMaster President Patrick Deane. “We are delighted that he chose McMaster to house and preserve this wonderful archive and that scholars and the public alike will have the opportunity to continue to explore his life, his work, and the much-loved stories that connected him so deeply to Canadians.”

McMaster will be celebrating the gift of the Stuart McLean Archive at a special event this spring.

 


Large-scale map offers insights into the Battle of Vimy Ridge

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Maps, Data, GIS
Workers install a 17 ft. by 13 ft. large scale map of Vimy Ridge in the foyer of Mills Library. The map, which will be on display until November 21, was created by Canadian Geographic using trench maps from McMaster’s extensive WWI collection and is available on loan to schools across Canada to help teach students about the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

Workers install a 17 ft. by 13 ft. large scale map of Vimy Ridge in the foyer of Mills Library. The map, which will be on display until November 21, was created by Canadian Geographic using trench maps from McMaster’s extensive WWI collection and is available on loan to schools across Canada to help teach students about the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

On April 9, 1917, after months of careful preparation, the Canadian Corps was ordered to seize Vimy Ridge.

The three-day battle that followed proved to be a decisive victory for the Canadians. It was the largest territorial advance of any Allied force up to that point in the war, and came to be considered by many a defining moment in Canada’s evolution from British dominion to independent nation, but it came at a terrible cost with more than 10,500 Canadian soldiers left dead or wounded.

Now a large-scale floor map of Vimy Ridge, created using trench maps from McMaster University Library’s extensive World War One map collection, is helping to teach new generations of high school students about this significant event in Canada’s history.

The 17 ft. by 13 ft. map – which will be on display in the foyer of Mills Library until November 21 – was created by Canadian Geographic and is available on loan to schools across Canada to help teach students about World War One and the Battle of Vimy Ridge.

“Every high school student in the country learns about Canada’s role in both World Wars – I’m so glad maps from our collection can help support their learning,” says Gord Beck, a map specialist in McMaster University Library’s Lloyd Reed Map Collection who worked with Canadian Geographic to source the maps used in the project.

Beck says the floor map is actually made up of two maps – one depicting the northern portion of the area in which the Battle of Vimy Ridge took place, the other depicting the southern portion. Both maps were drawn just months before the battle and would have provided military planners and soldiers with the most detailed and accurate information available at the time.

The Floor map, along with a suite of related learning activities, is available on loan to educators across Canada. Visit Canadian Geographic for details.

Canadian Geographic cartographer Chris Brackley digitally pieced the maps together to provide a complete picture of the battlefield.

“It gives students a real grasp of the sheer enormity and impact of the battle,” says Beck adding that the floor map allows students to see a wealth of detail including the location of machine gun posts and barbed wire, the position of enemy guns, the configuration of the trenches, the locations of underground tunnels, and the contours of the ridge itself.

Beck says the map is also a valuable tool for exploring the science of map making, which was changing rapidly during the first world war as a result of technological advances like the use of aerial photography. He says it even sheds light on the social and popular culture influences of the time.

“You can see from the map that many of the names given to the trenches are humourous – sometimes darkly humourous – and they were sometimes named after popular songs from the time, or after actresses or actors,” he says. “So, you can learn a lot more than military history from the map.”

Beck says McMaster’s collection of WWI trench maps and WWI aerial photographs are among the best in the world, adding that what makes the collection unique is that the maps have been digitized and are available online through the Library’s Digital Archive.

“When you digitize materials, you hope you’re going to increase the use of the maps and create awareness of the collections we have,” says Beck, adding that Canadian Geographic contacted him after finding the maps of Vimy Ridge online. “I’m happy that not only can the public go to our website and see the maps of Vimy, they can also look at any of the WWI maps from our collection.”

The Vimy Ridge floor map is one of a number of educational materials that were created as part of Canadian Geographic’s documentary series, Drawn to Victory, which explored the role of aerial photography and cartography in WWI.

Watch videos of Beck and McMaster’s Book and Paper Conservator, Audrie Schell – both interviewed for Drawn to Victory. Beck discusses McMaster’s collection of WWI trench maps and Schell talks about the efforts that go into preserving these materials.

 


In conversation with Terry Fallis, Monday November 6

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

Join Bryan Prince Booksellers in partnership with McMaster University Library on Monday, November 6, 2017 for a conversation with award-winning novelist Terry Fallis on his latest novel, One Brother Shy.

In this new novel, Fallis – the two-time winner of the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour, and author of The Best Laid Plans – tells the story of a man tormented by an event from his youth, and the journey he finds himself on to heal and to learn who he is.

When: Monday, November 6, 2017 at 7:00 p.m.
Where: The Reading Room at Bryan Prince Bookseller, 1060 King Street West, Hamilton

This is a free event, everyone is welcome.

Learn more about this event

In 2010, Fallis – a graduate of McMaster's Faculty of Engineering – donated his archives to McMaster University Library's William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections. Learn more about the archives of Terrry Fallis.

Terry Fallis is the award-winning author of four national bestsellers, all published by McClelland & Stewart. His debut novel, The Best Laid Plans, won the 2008 Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour and was crowned the 2011 winner of CBC Canada Reads. In January 2014, CBC aired a six-part television miniseries based on The Best Laid PlansThe High Road was published in September 2010 and was a finalist for the 2011 Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour. Terry’s third novel, Up and Down, was released in September 2012. It debuted on the Globe and Mail bestsellers list, was a finalist for the 2013 Leacock Medal, and won the 2013 Ontario Library Association Evergreen Award. In June 2013, the Canadian Booksellers Association presented Terry with the Libris Award for Author of the Year. Terry’s fourth novel, No Relation, hit bookstores in May 2014, opened on the Globe and Mail bestsellers list, and won the 2015 Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour.


International experts to speak on open access and textbook affordability

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Instruction
Nick Shockey, Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC (left) and Brady Yano, Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC, will be at McMaster on October 23 to discuss textbook affordability and the benefits of open access in research and education.The presentation is one of a number activities taking place in celebration of International Open Access Week.

Nick Shockey, Director of Programs & Engagement, SPARC (left) and Brady Yano, Assistant Director of Open Education, SPARC, will be at McMaster on October 23 to discuss textbook affordability and the benefits of open access in research and education.The presentation is one of a number activities taking place in celebration of International Open Access Week.

On Monday October 23, join the McMaster Students Union and McMaster University Library for Why Open? Open Access and Open Education at McMaster, a presentation on textbook affordability and the benefits of open access in research and education.

This session – one of a number of activities taking place in celebration of International Open Access Week (October 23 – 29) – will feature international open access experts, Nick Shockey and Brady Yano from the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) who will speak to these issues and provide insights on ways to get started at McMaster.

When: Monday October 23, 2017, 2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Where: MUSC, CIBC Hall, Rm. 319

*Drinks and cookies will be provided

Open Access is a worldwide movement to make scholarly publications, data, and educational resources available free of legal, financial or technical barriers for the benefit of researchers, institutions and society as a whole.

 See full schedule of Open Access Week events at McMaster.


Jamaica’s first lady tours McMaster Library’s Miss Lou Archives

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections
Jamaica’s first lady, the Most Honourable Juliet Holness (left), was recently at McMaster to view the archives of Louise Bennett Coverley, or “Miss Lou,” one of Jamaica’s most iconic and beloved performers.

Jamaica’s first lady, the Most Honourable Juliet Holness (left), was recently at McMaster to view the archives of Louise Bennett Coverley, or “Miss Lou,” one of Jamaica’s most iconic and beloved performers.

Jamaica’s first lady, the Most Honourable Juliet Holness, was recently at McMaster to view the archives of Louise Bennett Coverley, or “Miss Lou,” one of Jamaica’s most iconic and beloved performers.

Mrs. Holness, the member for St. Andrew East Rural in Jamaica’s House of Representatives and the wife of Jamaican Prime Minster, Andrew Holness, was in Canada to attend events marking the 55th anniversary of Jamaica’s independence.

The first lady toured the Miss Lou Archives, accompanied by a delegation that included Her Excellency Janice Miller, the High Commissioner of Jamaica to Canada, Judge Pamela Appelt, Citizenship Judge (retired), Court of Canadian Citizenship, and Howard Shearer, Chief Executive Canada at Hitachi Canada and former member of McMaster’s Board of Governors.

While on campus, Holness attended a luncheon at the University Club at which McMaster President, Patrick Deane, greeted the delegation and delivered remarks. Vivian Lewis, McMaster University Librarian, Peter Mascher, McMaster’s Associate Vice-President, International, Kayonne Christy, McMaster student, Wade Wyckoff, Associate University Librarian, Myron Groover, Archives and Rare Books Librarian, and Paul Grossman, Director of Development, McMaster University were also in attendance.

Lewis says she was honoured to welcome the first lady to McMaster, “I wish to extend my sincere thanks to Mrs. Holness for her visit, and for her interest in touring the Miss Lou Archives as Jamaica celebrates 55 years of independence,” she says.

Lewis also acknowledged Judge Appelt, who along with Fabian Coverley, donated the Miss Lou Archives to McMaster in 2010 and has played a key role in fostering an ongoing partnership between McMaster University Library and the National Library of Jamaica to promote and support Miss Lou scholarship.

“We deeply value the relationships Judge Appelt ­has helped us to build– both within the Jamaican-Canadian community and within Jamaica,” says Lewis. “These partnerships have allowed us to work across oceans to support the needs of scholars interested in the life and work of Miss Lou.”

The Miss Lou archives – part of the William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections – contains nine metres of textual, graphical and audiovisual materials that reflect the life and career of Miss Lou, a writer, performer and promoter of Jamaican culture.

The collection, which is heavily used by scholars around the world, contains correspondence, legal and financial documents, writing, published and printed materials, personal and professional documents, awards, and photographs from Miss Lou’s life in Canada. Materials from her early career in Jamaica are held by the National Library of Jamaica in Kingston.

The Miss Lou Archives opened in 2011, followed by a second accrual of material donated by Neil Armstrong in in 2015.

The archives complement McMaster’s strong collections of West Indies literature and history, which include the archives of award-winning author Austin Clark.

Some portions of the Miss Lou Archives are available online in McMaster Library’s Digital Archive.

 

 


Build “toys-with-a-purpose” at Thode Makerspace workshops

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Thode

Join visiting artist Maria Michails on October 19th and 20th in the new Thode Makerspace for two workshops aimed at introducing participants to the basics of electronics and while demonstrating how these devices can help broaden public awareness and engagement with environmental justice issues.

Part I – Workshop: Build an Air Quality Monitoring Rover
Thursday October 19 / 9:00-1:00 / Registration
Location: Thode Makerspace

This hands-on workshop introduces participants to low-cost air quality monitoring and data mapping. As low-cost hardware becomes readily available and continues to improve, these devices have the potential for broadened awareness and engagement, particularly for activists seeking to empower environmental justice communities. We will build an air quality monitoring rover using an Arduino, particulate (dust) sensor, a temperature and humidity sensors and an LCD display. Participants will learn the basics about Arduino, assembling code, powering the mobile device and all of its components, and mounting the hardware on a creatively re-purposed remote controlled toy truck. Instructor: Maria Michails

Part II – Citizen Science Air Quality Sensing Rover Walk & Data Mapping 
Friday October 20 / 1:30-3:00 
Location: Meet at the Sherman Centre at 1:00

After we complete the rovers we will take them for a ‘walk’ to collect data at predetermined locations. We will record our observations and then map the data for comparison readings depending on the location. These ‘augmented toys-with-a-purpose’ tend to attract attention on the street, therefore, the opportunity for public dialogue and engagement becomes a likely and welcomed occurrence. Lead: Maria Michails

The workshops are hosted by McMaster University Library's Lewis and Ruth Sherman Centre for Digital Scholarship.


Construction underway on new home for renowned Bertrand Russell Archive

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections
88 Forsythe Ave. N, across from McMaster’s Sterling Avenue entrance, will be the new home of McMaster University Library’s renowned Bertrand Russell Archives. The new space is scheduled to open this spring.

88 Forsythe Ave. N, across from McMaster’s Sterling Avenue entrance, will be the new home of McMaster University Library’s renowned Bertrand Russell Archives. The space is scheduled to open this spring.

McMaster’s renowned Bertrand Russell Archives – the university’s largest research collection –  will soon have a new home.

This spring, both the  Bertrand Russell Archives, and McMaster’s Bertrand Russell Research Centre will move from Mills Memorial Library to a new space at 88 Forsythe Ave. N – across from the university’s Sterling Avenue entrance.

Construction is now underway to convert the two-storey, 4300 sq. ft. space into a fully accessible, customized facility, that will ensure the proper storage and preservation of the archives, and also support a range of research activities related to Russell scholarship.

The archives will be located on the first floor, along with a reading room and display areas that will feature items from the collection including Russell’s personal writing desk and armchair. The second storey will house the Bertrand Russell Research Centre, complete with offices and a conference room.

“This unique space will allow us to support Russell scholarship and showcase this remarkable archive in a new, more engaging way,” says Vivian Lewis, McMaster University Librarian. “Not only will it provide a fitting new home for one of the university’s most significant cultural assets, it will serve as a centre of intellectual activity for current and future generations of scholars who continue to be inspired by Russell’s work.”

Considered one of the greatest thinkers of the twentieth century, Nobel laureate, Bertrand Russell (1872–1970), was a British philosopher, logician, social critic, and renowned peace advocate, whose work continues to be the subject of significant international scholarship. The archive is the largest available on Russell anywhere and is regularly used by scholars from around the world.

The archives first came to McMaster University Library in 1968 and has remained among the most significant collections in the Library’s William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections. The archive contains Russell’s personal library, along with his correspondence, manuscripts, tapes, films, photographs, his Nobel Medal in Literature and his writing desk.

The new space at 88 Forsythe Ave. N will open in the spring of 2018. The opening will be part of a year of celebrations marking the 50th anniversary of the Library’s acquisition of the Bertrand Russell Archives.

 


Science Literacy Week 2017

Submitted by libbalche on
Filed under Library News:  Thode
Join McMaster University Library during the week of September 18-24, 2017 for a great lineup of events and activities in celebration of Science Literacy Week.

Join McMaster University Library during the week of September 18-24, 2017 for a great lineup of events and activities in celebration of Science Literacy Week.

Science Literacy Week is an opportunity to celebrate the science that is happening all around us on campus and across Canada. Join McMaster University Library and our partners during the week of September 18-24, 2017 for a great lineup of events and activities.

Follow @ThodeLibrary on Twitter to participate in our week-long trivia contest, and test your science knowledge on our arcade cabinet.

TEDxMcMasterUSalon Lunchtime series

TEDx Salons are smaller gatherings that allow attendees to interact with the speakers and discuss with like-minded audience members. Drs. Gibala and McNeill will be sharing their journeys as science communicators, and encouraging the audience to think about how we can better communicate science to the public.

Sept. 19 – Dr. Martin Gibala, The Science of Fitness: Translating the Message
12:00-1:00pm, outside the Thode Library Makerspace (Lower Level)

Over the last decade, high-intensity interval training has evolved from a niche training method for serious athletes to the top fitness trend worldwide. Martin Gibala’s research team at McMaster has been at the forefront of this exploding field of science, conducting groundbreaking studies on time-efficient workouts to boost health and fitness. Gibala has conducted hundreds of television, radio and print interviews with outlets ranging from The New York Times and TIME to Conan and Reddit. Together with Chris Shulgan, a journalist and the co-author of his bestselling book, The One-Minute Workout, Gibala will discuss his experience translating the fitness message, including the opportunities, challenges and potential pitfalls of science communication.

Sept. 21 – Dr. Fiona McNeill, Fighting Fake News: the Need for Scientists to Speak Up!
12:00-1:00pm, outside the Thode Library Makerspace (Lower Level)

Recently, we have seen our world filled with stories of ‘fake news’ and ‘alternative facts’ and this is extending into science. For example, the New York Times recently published a climate change denying op-ed, and news radio hosts have been calling hurricane forecasts ‘hoaxes’. More than ever, the world is going to need scientists who are prepared to enter the public eye, and talk about their work. Fiona McNeill is going to talk about her experiences with ‘fake news’ and engage in a discussion of the steps scientists can and must take and the consequences for our world if they don't.

Science Invasion of Mills Library
Sept. 18-22, 11:30am-1:30pm, Mills Library Lobby

Breaking free of the confines of Thode Library, Science Literacy Week is invading Mills Library with the help of McMaster’s Let’s Talk Science crew. Monday through Friday, take a few minutes out of your day to check out cool science demos from Let’s Talk Science volunteers, and learn a little, too.

Thode Makerspace Workshop Series

*All events take place in the Thode Library Makerspace, on the lower level

The Poetry of Science with Hamilton Youth Poets
Sept. 19, 6:30-8:30p
m

Science and poetry give us the unique ability to understand the world around us. There is a way to take abstract concepts and turn them into art to make them more accessible. The McMaster Space Initiative and Hamilton Youth Poets invite you to join them in this first writing workshop of two to learn the art of weaving science into poetry. Mentors from HYP will give a tutorial on basic poetry creating techniques.

Digital Literacy: Skills and Strategies for Navigating an Era of Fake News, Conspiracism, and Systemic Distrust – a workshop with Dr. Mark Busser
Sept. 20, 12:00-1:00pm

At a time when many of us read our news through the medium of social media, how do we know which stories to trust? This workshop on digital literacy will examine the problem of fake news, explore the roots of conspiracism and the general distrust in scientific communities and authorities. We will learn how to recognize types of fake news and identify the telltale signs of fake news sites. In order to turn our cynicism about the news industry towards a healthy skepticism, we will explore some interdisciplinary remedies to curb the systemic distrust in science.

IT Security Hygiene – Protecting Your Information
Sept. 20, 6:00-7:00pm

Presenter: Wayde Nie, Manager, Servers, Storage and Architecture, UTS
How valuable is your MacID?  What are some safeguards and best practices that can be used to improve security and privacy at work? This presentation is geared toward reviewing basic principles of IT Security hygiene, with a focus on our responsibilities as individuals to protect our MacIDs, safeguard our systems and network, and to be a good digital citizen on the McMaster Domain.

Energy and Sustainability Workshop
Sept. 21, 6:00-8:15pm

McMaster Undergraduate Energy Society (6-7pm)

Presenters: Zainab Husain (VP Events & Campus Outreach) & Nelson Mok (VP Academic)
Through this workshop, we want to debunk some important myths about the energy industry and give students a snapshot of what powers their daily lives. Broken down into simple concepts a multidisciplinary audience can understand, we aim to give students a better understanding of clean energy of today and what innovations are being made to make it more sustainable.

Engineers Without Borders, McMaster Chapter (7:15-8:15pm)

Sustainable development is defined as the development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Through this interactive case study, we will explore the framework for creating local and global sustainable development and the challenges that come along with it!

It Takes Two: How Iron Gall Ink Accelerates Paper Degradation
Sept. 22, 12:30-1:20pm

Presenters: Audrie Schell and Itxel Castro-Soto, Conservators
In this session, McMaster University Library’s conservators will talk about the science of book and paper preservation.  It all starts with chemical structure of cellulose which is the major component of paper, and how hydrolysis and oxidation affect those structures. Making matters more complicated is Iron Gall ink, the primary ink in use for many centuries, which accelerates paper decay.

Electronics for the Rest of us!
Sept. 22, 5:00-9:00pm & Sept. 23, 10:30am-4:30pm
Limited Enrollment: 
Full details and registration details

To most of us, the workings of the electronic devices that accompany (and enable!) our everyday lives often seem mysterious and opaque -- an area of concern for only the most qualified ‘techies’.  This doesn’t need to be the case. This two-day workshop will give students an opportunity to develop their skills by designing and building a functional electronic device.

Planetarium Show: Matters of Size
Sept. 20, 7:00pm & 8:15pm, W.J. McCallion Planetarium, Burke Science Building

Registration preferred but tickets may also be available at the door. Tickets: $7 per person

It is an astounding fact that the laws of Nature at different scales can be understood separately---e.g., you don't need to know about atoms to know how a baseball soars into the stands. Still more remarkable is that astronomy affords us opportunities to study science at almost all scales. In this show, we'll see examples of how astronomy can be used to study the very small, the very large, and the very in-between

Events happening throughout Hamilton: 

Terryberry Public Library (100 Mohawk Rd. W., Hamilton. 905-546-3921) 

*Pre-Registration required for many events

TED Talks for Science Literacy Week – Sept. 18, 2:30pm

Intro to Code with Ozobots – Sept. 18, 4:00pm Ages 8-12

Appy Hour – Sept. 19, 2:30pm

Polar Bears: Life in the Arctic – Sept. 20, 7:00pm

Science4Fun: Here Comes the Light, Light and More Light – Sept. 21, 4:00pm. Ages 8 - 12

2 minutes and 18 seconds in the Shadow of the Moon – Sept. 21, 7:00pm

Saltfleet Public Library (131 Gray Rd., Stoney Creek. 905-662-8611)

The Past, Present and Future of Planet 9 – Sept. 18, 6:00pm
Pre-Registration required

Kenilworth Public Library (103 Kenilworth Ave. N., Hamilton. 905-546-3960)

Protecting Pollinators in Hamilton – Sept. 20, 11:00am
Pre-Registration required


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