Archives & Research Collections

Gale to Digitize Holocaust & Resistance Collections

Submitted by libkkerr on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

Gale, part of Cengage Learning, and McMaster University Library announced an agreement for Gale to digitize the Library's WWII Holocaust, propaganda and Jewish underground resistance collections.


Archives Come Alive at TwelvEighty

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Mills Archives & Research Collections

The walls of the TwelvEighty restaurant and bar in Gilmour Hall were transformed this past spring with archival photographs from The William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections in Mills Memorial Library.


A Hidden Child in War-Torn Holland: Emmy Weisz’s Story

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

Emmy Weisz’s archives (called the Anholt and van Dijk family fonds) can be accessed by visiting The William Ready Division of Archives and Research Collections, located in Mills Library.


Marquee Magazine Archives Donated to McMaster University

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

A significant collection of publicity materials from an era that produced some of the biggest box-office successes in Hollywood history—Star Wars, Chariots of Fire, E.T., Raging Bull, Apocalypse Now, Silence of the Lambs, Pulp Fiction and Titanic among them—has been donated to McMaster University by alumnus David Haslam, founder of Marquee magazine, and his wife Alexandra Lenhoff.


Who was Lorraine?

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

An archival detective has gotten to the bottom of a mysterious photo album acquired by Mills Library nearly a year ago.


Alethea’s Book: A Philosophy Primer in the Russell Archives

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

An ancestral manuscript on philosophy has recently been acquired by the Bertrand Russell archives: 12 × 18.5 cm; 151, [2, index] pp., pencil annotations on endleaves; bound in half-red morocco with marbled boards. The manuscript was written in 1834 by the Whig politician John Thomas Stanley (1766-1850), 1st Baron Stanley of Alderley, for his newborn granddaughter, who would grow up to be the women’s welfare activist the Hon. Maude Alethea Stanley (1833-1915). To put this into a larger Russellian context, John Thomas Stanley was Bertrand Russell’s great grandfather on his mother’s side.


Al Purdy: Saving the A-Frame

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

"So we built a house, my wife and I
our house at a backwater puddle of a lake
near Ameliaburg, Ont. spending
our last hard-earned buck to buy second-hand lumber


Latest Issue of Library Newsletter now Online

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Mills Innis Thode Archives & Research Collections

The most recent edition of the McMaster Library News has just been posted online.


2010 ASECS Fellowship Awarded to Dr. James Woolley

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

McMaster University Library is pleased to announce that it has awarded a visiting ASECS fellowship to Dr. James Woolley, Smith Professor of English at Lafayette College. ASECS (the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies) sponsors and sustains research at 15 research centres and libraries in North America; the ASECS program at McMaster University is jointly funded by ASECS and the Faculty of Humanities. Dr. Woolley’s project is entitled “Toward a Full New Edition of Jonathan Swift’s Poems: Swift’s Texts and the Barry Brown Collection”.


I Trust That You Will Forgive the Late Fines

Submitted by libbairdca on
Filed under Library News:  Archives & Research Collections

George Washington may never have told a lie, but he apparently borrowed two books on 5 October 1789 from a library in New York City and never returned them. Here at McMaster, we haven’t had quite a dramatic case of overdue books. It would have been difficult for Washington to borrow books from the University Library since he died in 1799, almost 90 years before the founding of our university. Nonetheless, if Washington in his posthumous state showed up at our circulation desk wanting to borrow our books, we’d have good reason to be skeptical and not to issue a library card in his name.


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